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Shopping in Tallinn, Estonia

Tallinn is home to some interesting markets, shopping complexes, galleries, and craft stores that appeal to all tastes and interests.

  • Katariina Kaik—a series of artisans’ studios with the works of 14 female designers with pieces such as ceramics, textiles, patchwork quilts, hats, jewelry, stained glass, and leather-bound books; off Vene 12
  • Masters’ Courtyard—a 13th century courtyard with a chocolatery/café, a guesthouse, and artisans’ stores that sell ceramics; glass; jewelry; knitwear; woodwork; and candles; Vene 6
  • Balti Jaama Turg—a market complex with niche food vendors in huts, a supermarket, food halls, green grocers, fashion retailers, and a gym; Kopli 1
  • Estonian Design House—a store with designs from over 100 Estonian designers selling shoes, lamps, furniture, ceramics, and sustainable clothing; Kalasdama 8
  • Kalev—a legendary sweet shop open since 1806 with chocolates and other confections; Roseni 7
  • Solaris Centre—a shopping complex with a supermarket, boutiques, a bookstore, restaurants, and cinemas; Estonia pst 9
  • Ivo Nikkolo—one of the first labels to come from independent Estonia that is known for its women’s clothing in casual and dresswear made with natural fabrics; Suur-Karja 14
  • Telliskivi Flea Market—a flea market with clothing, books, and household items; Telliskivi 60a
  • Nu Nordik—a boutique that sells unique household products, clothing, accessories, and jewelry with a Nordic aesthetic; Vabaduse valjak 8
  • Viru Keskus—a large shopping mall with over 100 stores including fashion boutiques, a bookstore, and a ticket agency; Viru valjak 4/6
  • Kaubamaja—an upscale clothing store with international and local labels such as Ivo Nikkolo, Bastion, and Monton; Gonsiori 2
  • Rae Antiik—an antique market with items such as samovars, military items, and Orthodox icons; Raekoja plats 11
  • Luhikese Jala Galerii—a small gallery with textiles, jewelry, glass art, and ceramics from local artists; Luhike jalg 6
  • Central Market—Tallinn’s largest market with vendors selling fresh produce and shops selling a variety of items including Soviet memorabilia; Keldrimae 9
  • Foorum Keskus—a high-end shopping avenue; Narva mnt 5
  • Zizi—a housewares store with Estonian-made linen napkins, place mats, tablecloths, and cushion covers; Vene 12
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Sights in Tallinn, Estonia

Tallinn is the capital of Estonia and is rich in culture and history. It was formerly occupied by Nazi and Soviet forces and only became an independent country in 1991.

  • Estonian Open-Air Museum—a sprawling complex with historic Estonian buildings, a chapel dating back to 1699, and an old wooden tavern serving traditional Estonian cuisine and activities such as weaving, blacksmithing, and cooking; Vabaohumuuseumi tee 12
  • Kumu—a futuristic-looking seven story building made of limestone, glass, and copper that contains the largest collection of Estonian art in the country and rotating contemporary exhibits as well as a permanent collection featuring works from the early 18th century to the end of World War II and art from the Soviet era; A. Weizenbergi 34
  • Lennusadam—a maritime museum honoring Estonia’s extensive history with the open seas that was designed in a concrete shell frame fashion and includes a walk-through 1930s naval submarine and ice-breaker and minehunter ships outside; Vesilennuki 6
  • Kadriorg Art Museum—a Baroque palace built by Peter the Great between 1718 and 1736 that has a branch of the Estonian Art Museum that is devoted to Dutch, German, and Italian paintings from the 16th to the 18th centuries and Russian works from the 18th to early 20th centuries; A. Weizenbergi 37
  • Niguliste Museum—a deconsecrated church originally built in the 13th century but was damaged by Soviet bombers in 1944 and a fire in the 1980s but has since been restored and is now home to a branch of the Estonian Art Museum devoted to religious art with artifacts such as painted altarpieces, carved tombstones, and ecclesiastical silverware; Niguliste 3
  • Great Guild Hall—a building dating back to 1410 that was once home to the Great Guild and is now the Estonian History Museum with interactive displays on Estonia, coins dating back to Viking times, military artifacts, and Estonian cultural exhibits; Pikk 17
  • Nuku—a puppet museum which has a collection that introduces the art of puppeteers from different cultures and eras through interactive exhibits and workshops; Nunne 8
  • Tallinn Botanic Garden—a lush garden with 8,000 species of plants scattered between greenhouses, themed gardens, and arboretums; Kloostrimetsa tee 52
  • Tallinn Zoo—this zoo has the world’s largest collection of mountain goats and sheep plus 350 other species of animals such as lions, leopards, elephants, bears, lynx, owls, and eagles; Paldiski mnt 145
  • Kadriorg Park—a large park commissioned by Peter the Great for his wife Catherine I after his conquest of Estonia that has oak, lilac, and horse chestnut trees; a formal pond; gardens; and a playground
  • Tallinn TV Tower—a 341-meter-tall tower opened in celebration of the 1980 Olympics that has great views from the 22nd floor, interactive displays in the space-age pods, and an adventure walk; Kloostrimetsa tee 58a
  • Museum of Occupations—a museum with displays that depict the struggles and hardships of 50 years of occupations briefly under the Nazis and then by Soviets with evocative videos, photos, and artifacts; Toompea 8
  • City Museum—the main branch of the City Museum (there are ten sites overall) is located in a 14th century merchant’s house and illustrates the city’s development from its early days with displays on Estonian language, everyday life, artifacts, and cultural development; Vene 17
  • Alexander Nevsky Orthodox Cathedral—a beautiful onion-domed Russian Orthodox cathedral completed in 1900 known for its icons and frescoes; Lossi plats 10
  • Town Council Pharmacy—the oldest continually operating pharmacy in Europe once run by the same family until 1913 and featuring painted beams and a small historical display; Raekoja plats 11
  • Mikkel Museum—a former kitchen in Kadriorg Palace that now has some of the Estonian Art Museum’s collection with a small collection of paintings and porcelain; A. Weizenbergi 28
  • Estonian Museum of Natural History—a natural history museum with over 300,000 examples of the country’s plants and animals with revolving exhibitions; Lai 29a
  • Maarjamae Palace—a limestone manor house built in 1874 for a Russian count that is now home to the Estonian Film Museum, a branch of the Estonian History Museum focusing on 20th century Estonia, and a Soviet sculpture graveyard; Pirita tee 56
  • Maarjamae War Memorial—a Soviet-era monument with a bowed obelisk set within a concrete plaza with part of the complex built in 1975 as a memorial to Red Army soldiers killed fighting the Nazis; Pirita tee
  • Tallinn Museum of Orders of Knighthood—a museum featuring one of Europe’s largest collections of medals and military insignia; Kuninga 3
  • Estonian National Library—one of independent Estonia’s first public buildings designed with dolomite limestone that has frequent exhibitions on the upper floors; Tonismagi 2
  • Children’s Museum Miaamilla in Kadriorg—a small museum and activity center for children between the ages of 3 and 11 with a child-size grocery store, activity room, and café; L. Koidula 21c, Kadriorg Park
  • Architecture Museum—a museum that displays building and town models and temporary exhibitions; Ahtri 2
  • House of Peter I—a cottage that Peter the Great and Catherine I occupied during their visits to Tallinn that is filled with portraits, furniture, and artifacts from the period; Maekalda 2
  • Draakoni Gallery—a commercial gallery that has small but interesting exhibitions of contemporary art including works from many local artists; Pikk 18