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Sights in Amsterdam

Amsterdam is the lively capital of the Netherlands and has a rich and vibrant history. It has many museums, interesting architecture, beautiful parks, and plenty more to explore.

  • Allard Pierson Museum—a former National Bank that is now home to a museum with archaeological treasures from the University of Amsterdam’s collection from the early development of Western civilization with Roman and Egyptian artifacts and Near Eastern cultures (Anatolia, Persia, and Palestine); Oude Turfmarkt 127
  • Amsterdam Museum—a museum housed in a rambling series of buildings with the Schuttersgalerij (Civil Guards Gallery) filled with portraits of city militias and 21st century versions of civil guards’ paintings; Kalverstraat 92 and Sint Luciensteeg 27
  • Amsterdam Pipe Museum—a museum that illustrates the history of tobacco trading and smoking in Amsterdam with a large collection of items such as prehistoric pipes, smoking gear from around the world, pipe making tools, tobacco wrappers, and vignettes; Prinsengracht 488
  • Amsterdamse Bos (Amsterdam Forest)—a nearly 2,500-acre and 124 miles of foot, bike, and bridle paths crossed by 116 bridge crossings in Amsterdam’s largest park that has large recreational fields, a boating lake, the Olympic Bosbaan rowing course, playgrounds, and water-play areas as well as a goat farm; Bosbaanweg 5, Amstelveen
  • Anne Frank House—the home where Anne Frank and her family as well as the Van Pels family and a dentist moved into and hid in a maze of rooms in the back; Prinsengracht 263-267
  • Artis (Amsterdam Zoo)—a zoo founded in 1838 that has more than 900 species of animals, over 200 species of trees, a butterfly pavilion, and an insectarium as well as the Micropia, the world’s first museum devoted to microbes; Plantage Kerklaan 38-40
  • Beurs van Berlage (Berlage’s Stock Exchange)—Amsterdam’s first modern building and the country’s most significant piece of 20th century architecture that was once a stock exchange and now has room for conferences, collaborative workspaces, exhibitions, and events; Damrak 243
  • Bijbels Museum (Bible Museum)—a beautiful museum with a large collection of Bibles, exhibits on archaeological finds from the Middle East, and models of ancient temples; Herengracht 366-368
  • Centrale Openbare Bibliotheek Amsterdam (Central Amsterdam Public Library)—the country’s largest public library with a large theater, seminar and conference rooms, an art space, and a large music library as well as an incredible international magazine selection, a restaurant on the 7th floor, and over 1000 desks available for study and going online; Oosterdokskade 143
  • Cobra Museum of Art—an art museum with hundreds of pieces by the avant-garde CoBra movement including paintings, sculptures, and ceramics as well as temporary modern art exhibitions; Sandbergplein 1, Amstelveen
  • Eye Film Institute Netherlands—a futuristic-looking waterfront structure that has film archives, four huge screening rooms that show classic and modern films, a permanent display with historical objects and interactive elements from cinema, and a public library; IJpromenade 1
  • Heineken Experience—a museum dedicated to the Heineken beer label that is an interactive visitor center with tours of the former brewery including its vast copper vats and multimedia exhibits and a 4D virtual reality ride that simulates the brewing and bottling process; Stadhouderskade 78
  • Het Scheepvaartmuseum (Maritime Museum)—this former arsenal for the Admiralty of Amsterdam became the home of the Maritime Museum in the 1970s with a glass and steel roof and an interior that has one-room exhibitions each with different themes and items such as maritime objects, paintings, a significant globe collection, nautical instruments, yacht models, and ship decorations and two family-oriented wings with interactive activities such as a sea voyage and an exhibition about whales; Kattenburgerplein 1
  • Homomonument—the world’s first monument to persecuted gays and lesbians that was designed by Karin Daan and unveiled in 1987 and features three huge pink granite triangles that represent the past, present, and future and the points of the triangles pointing to the Anne Frank House, the National Monument on Dam Square, and the COC Center (a gay and lesbian organization founded in 1946); Westermarkt
  • Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam—a botanical garden originally configured as a medicinal garden in 1638 by the Amsterdam City Council before the collection expanded to include exotic plants from the East India Company’s foreign expeditions with 4,000 species of plants in the ornamental gardens, a three-climate greenhouse, and a butterfly house as well as an orangery with a café terrace; Plantage Middenlaan 2a
  • Huis Marseille (Marseille House)—a contemporary photography museum located in a 17th century canal house and the neighboring house that was once owned by a wealthy merchant and now has 13 exhibition rooms that show various genres of photography and thousands of photography books in the library; Keizersgracht 401
  • Magere Brug (Skinny Bridge)—the most famous of Amsterdam’s drawbridges that provides wonderful views of the Amstel and surrounding area and is illuminated at night; between Kerkstraat and Nieuwe Kerkstraat
  • Museum Het Rembrandthuis (Rembrandt House Museum)—a grand home owned by Rembrandt until his bankruptcy in 1656 with a restored interior that has reception rooms filled with elegant furniture and artwork and a small etching studio with a printing press and a line hung with drying prints (the museum owns 260 of the 290 etchings Rembrandt made); Jodenbreestraat 4
  • Museum Van Loon—formerly the home of one of Rembrandt’s most successful students, Ferdinand Bol, this house and its neighbor were remodeled in the 18th century by Abraham van Hagan and his wife Caterina Trapp, and was occupied by the prominent Van Loon family from 1886 to 1960 before a major restoration returned it to its 18th century incarnation and turned it into a museum with elegant salons filled with Van Loon portraits and possessions; Keizersgracht 672
  • NEMO Science Center—a copper-clad building opened in 1997 that was designed by world-famous architect Renzo Piano in a curved shape resembling a ship’s bow rising out of the water and featuring a rooftop café and terrace with the major highlight being five floors of hands-on and high-tech scientific activities for children such as bubbles on the ground floor and experiments in the Wonder Lab; Oosterdok 2
  • Rijksmuseum—one of the world’s top art museums with works by Van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Vermeer and 7,500 other works of art such as Delftware, detailed dollhouses, and the Asian Pavilion; Museumstraat 1
  • Van Gogh Museum—a museum that has the world’s largest collection of Van Gogh’s masterpieces and traces his life history with additional pieces by Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Monet, and Bernard; Museumplein 6
  • Hermitage Amsterdam—a branch of St. Petersburg’s State Hermitage Museum that shows the relationship between Russia and the Netherlands with temporary exhibitions displaying works from the Hermitage’s collection and a portrait gallery of 17th century Dutch luminaries; Amstel 51
  • A’Dam Tower—a 22-story building with excellent panoramic rooftop views of the city, a four-person swing over the edge, a green-screen for photos, a bar, two nightclubs, a revolving restaurant, and a stylish hotel; Overhoeksplein 1
  • Royal Palace—originally a town hall, this building became a palace in the 19th century with marblework inside including a floor with maps of the world, 51 chandeliers, damasks, gilded clocks, and paintings by Ferdinand Bol and Jacob de Wit; Dam
  • Stedelijk Museum—a museum featuring the collection of its curator Willem Sandberg with a rotating selection of works by Picasso, Matisse, Mondrian, Van Gogh, Rothko, De Kooning, and Warhol with activities for children in the family zone; Museumplein 10
  • Museum Willet-Holthuysen—a canal house built in 1687 and remodeled in 1739 that is named after Louisa Willet-Holthuysen who inherited the home from her merchant father and lived there with her husband; she sold the house to the city in 1895 and inside are displays featuring part of the family’s 275-piece Meissen table service and a French-style garden; Herengracht 605
  • Joods Historisch Museum—a restored complex of four Ashkenazi synagogues from the 17th and 18th centuries with displays highlighting the growth of Jewish enterprise and how it contributed to the Dutch economy and the history of Jews in the Netherlands; Nieuwe Amstelstraat 1
  • Verzetsmuseum—a museum that illustrates German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II through letters, artifacts, and personal stories showing resistance and at times collaboration with Nazi forces with a section on what was then the Dutch East Indies and is now Indonesia; Plantage Kerklaan 61
  • Micropia—the world’s first microbe museum with hands-on exhibits and microscopes to look through with facts on living organisms and how they exist on everyday objects as well as information on viruses; Artisplein, Plantage Kerklaan 38-40
  • Tropenmuseum—a three story collection of artifacts from former colonies including Indonesian shadow puppets and dioramas of tropical life with a hands-on children’s section, a music section, a gift shop, and a café; Linnaeusstraat 2
  • Foam—a prominent photography gallery with spacious galleries featuring skylights and large windows showcasing major annual exhibitions; Keizersgracht 609
  • Nieuwe Kerk—a 15th century late-Gothic basilica with an interior featuring a grand carved oak chancel, a bronze choir screen, a large organ, and large stained-glass windows that is typically used for art exhibitions and concerts; Dam
  • Westergasfabriek—a late 19th century Dutch Renaissance complex that was the western gasworks for the city until 1967 before it was restored into a cultural and recreational park with spacious lawns, a wading pool, bike paths, and buildings housing creative businesses such as advertising agencies and TV production studios with regular festivals, events, dining, and entertainment; Pazzanistraat
  • Het Grachtenhuis—an interactive museum with multimedia exhibits that explore how the canals and houses that line the city’s Canal Ring were built; Herengracht 386
  • Hollandsche Schouwburg—a theater opened in 1892 that was a cultural hub until World War II when Germans turned it first into a theater solely for Jews and then a detention center for Jews scheduled for deportation to death camps; inside are glass panels engraved with the names of deported Jewish families and an exhibit hall with photos and artifacts of Jewish life before and during the war; Plantage Middenlaan 24
  • Amsterdam Tulip Museum—a small museum that provides an overview of the country’s favorite flower through exhibits, timelines, and English films about the history of tulips with a collection of tulip vases and a gift shop; Prinsengracht 116
  • Stadsarchief—a striped building dating back to 1923 that was a former bank and is now home to Amsterdam city archives with displays including the 1942 police report on the theft of Anne Frank’s bike and a letter from Charles Darwin to Artis Royal Zoo; Vijzelstraat 32
  • Huis Marseille—a curated photography museum with traveling shows with varying themes such as portraiture, nature, or regional photography and exhibitions over several floors; Keizersgracht 401
  • Amstelpark—a park created in 1972 for a flower show that occurs throughout the country every ten years with creative garden layouts featuring a variety of flower species, a petting zoo, miniature golf, and a playground; Europaboulevard
  • Hortus Botanicus—a botanical garden since 1638 that flourished as tropical seeds and plants were smuggled by Dutch trading ships and from there coffee, pineapple, cinnamon, and palm-oil plants were distributed; it now features 4,000 species of plants kept in a seed house and a three-climate greenhouse and a butterfly house; Plantage Middenlaan 2a
  • Geelvinck Pianola Museum—a museum featuring a collection of pianolas dating back to the early 1900s, 30,000 music rolls, and a player pipe organ; Westerstraat 106
  • Multatuli Museum—the former home of novelist Eduard Douwes Dekker who is best known for Max Havelaar, a novel about colonialists in the Dutch East Indies, that is now a museum that describes his life and work; Korsjespoortsteeg 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sights in Monte Carlo, Monaco

Monte Carlo is the capital of Monaco and is a beautiful city close to the ocean with museums, parks, interesting collections, and gardens.

  • Casino de Monte Carlo—a lavish casino with marble and gold décor open to visitors in the morning and for gambling after 2 pm with games such as blackjack; English and European roulette; baccarat; and poker as well as slot machines in two gambling salons; Place du Casino
  • Musee Oceanographique de Monaco—this world-renowned museum stuck to the edge of a cliff since 1910 has an aquarium with a 6-meter-deep lagoon with sharks and predators separated from tropical fish by a coral reef, two colonnaded rooms which illustrate the history of oceanography and marine biology as well as Prince Albert I’s contributions to the field, and 90 tanks overall in the aquarium with 450 Mediterranean and tropical species; Av. St-Martin
  • Jardin Exotique—a series of gardens with the world’s largest succulent and cactus collection from echinocereus to African candelabras and mazes of paths, stairs, and bridges; 62 Boulevard du Jardin Exotique
  • Palais Princier de Monaco—a palace that is the private residence of the Grimaldi family protected by the Carabiniers du Prince with a changing of the guard daily at 11:55 am and tours of the state apartments that feature lavish furniture and artwork collected by the family over the course of centuries; Place du Palais
  • Collection de Voitures Anciennes—a large car collection amassed by the late Prince Rainier beginning in the early 1950s and opened to the public in 1993 with Ferraris, Maseratis, Lamborghinis, Rolls Royces, several F1 and rally race cars, and the Lexus that took the current prince to his wedding in 2011; Terrasses du Fontvielle
  • Roseraie Princesse Grace—a collection of over 4000 rose bushes next to the Parc Fontevielle that is particularly colorful in the spring; Avenue des Papalins
  • Cathedrale de Monaco—an 1875 Romanesque-Byzantine cathedral that has the graves of Prince Rainier and Princess Grace Kelly; 4 rue Colonel Bellando de Castro
  • Parc Princesse Antoinette—a park in the hills above La Condamine shaded by centenary olive trees and a family-favorite for its playground and miniature golf course
  • Nouveau Musee National de Monaco—a white villa built for an American in 1913 that is part of Nouveau Musee National de Monaco and hosts seasonal contemporary art exhibitions that are environmentally themed; 56 Boulevard du Jardin Exotique
  • Musee des Timbres et des Monnaies—a one-room museum that illustrates the history of stamps and coins minted in Monaco with an interesting stamp collection featuring stamps of Dante and Grace Kelly among others, animals, and 1950s movies; 11 Terrasses de Fontevielle
  • Eglise Ste-Devote—a 19th century chapel dedicated to the patron saint of Monaco who was brought to the church after she became a martyr in Corsica in 303 AD; 1 Rue Sainte-Devote

Sights in Luxembourg City

Luxembourg City is the capital of the small country of Luxembourg and has a beautiful old church, several museums, and art galleries to explore.

  • Casemates de la Petrusse (Military Tunnels)—a former fortress that was hollowed out to form a maze of passages running for almost 15 miles below the town with ten gates controlling admittance to the walls, this was also a storage facility and place of refuge that now has two sections of the passages containing former barracks, slaughterhouses, bakeries, and a deep well open for visitors; Pl. de la Constitution
  • Cathedrale Notre-Dame—a late Gothic style cathedral with a portal sculpted by Daniel Muller of Freiburg and a beautiful Baroque organ gallery as well as a crypt that contains the tomb of the 14th century King of Bohemia and Count of Luxembourg, John the Blind, and the tombs of the grand-ducal dynasty; Rue Notre-Dame
  • Centre Culturel de Rencontre Abbaye de Neumunster (Neumunster Abbey Cultural Center)—the former place of worship for the Benedictines of Neumunster Abbey who were expelled when the French Revolution hit Luxembourg that served for most of the 20th century as a men’s prison but is now a major cultural center with temporary exhibitions and a Baroque church that has treasures such as a Black Madonna; 28 Rue Munster
  • Le Bock—a cliff that served as the main approach to the town dating back to Celtic and Roman times until bridges were erected with great views of the Plateau du Rham across the way, Duke Wencelas’s fortifications, barracks that are now used as a hospice for the elderly, Neumunster Abbey, and the Casemates du Bock; Montee de Clausen
  • Monument National de la Solidarite (National Monument of Unity)—this memorial to Luxembourg’s soldiers who died in World War II and those who died in the Holocaust is a stern granite and steel monument with the walls of the small chapel containing a symbolic tombstone made entirely of stained glass; Bd. FD Roosevelt at Citadelle du St-Esprit
  • Musee National D’ Histoire Naturelle (National Museum of Natural History)—this museum situated within a former women’s prison has interactive exhibits and dioramas that convey an environmental message; Rue Munster 23
  • Musee National D’ Histoire Et D’Art (National Museum of History and Art)—an art museum with great paintings by expressionist Joseph Kutter, Luxembourg’s most famous artist, and an art gallery with pieces by Cranach and Turner as well as a wonderful collection of 15th to 19th century art by artists such as Bruegel, Rembrandt, and Canaletto; Marche-aux-Poissons
  • Musee D’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean—an architectural landmark designed by I.M. Pei with an edifice made of limestone and glass with the glass shaped into pyramids, the interior has changing exhibitions by contemporary artists; Park Drai Eechelen 3
  • Musee D’ Histoire De la Ville De Luxembourg (Luxembourg City Historical Museum)—a multimedia interactive museum opened in 1996 that illustrates the development of Luxembourg City over the course of 1,000 years; Rue du St-Esprit
  • Palais Grand-Ducal (Grand-Ducal Palace)—the finest building in the city that dates back to the 16th century and has a façade inspired by the Spanish and Moorish while inside business and entertainment functions occur and a large art collection is displayed; Rue du Marche-aux-Herbes
  • Porte des Trois Tour (Gate of the Three Towers)—three turrets that are remains of the fortress with the oldest of the towers built around 1050 and during the French Revolution was the site of the guillotine; Rue Wiltheim at bd. J. Ulveling
  • Vallee de la Petrusse (Petrusse Valley)—a broad park located in the canyon of the Petrusse river with the Chapelle Saint-Quirin built into the rocks and a cave said to have been carved by Celts; between Rue de la Semois and rue St-Quirin
  • Villa Vauban—also known as the City of Luxembourg Art Gallery, this mansion is surrounded by well-tended gardens and is the home of Luxembourg City’s collection of old master paintings by artists such as Canaletto and Van Dyck; Avenue Emile Reuter 18

 

Shopping in Vilnius

Vilnius has some unique shops, markets, book stores, and museum shops to browse and shop at with many craft stores in particular.

  • Senuju Amatu Dirbtuves—this small shop displays the tools, materials, processes, and final products of traditional crafts such as weaving, paper-making, book-binding, leather-working, and metalworking and teaches these crafts as well; Saviciaus gatve 10
  • Gedimino 9—housed in a mid-Victorian building used by government, newspapers, and nightclubs over the years, this shopping complex has international brands such as H&M and the Body Shop; Gedimino prospektas 9
  • Vinny’s—a vintner that sells wine and spirits from across Europe and Lithuanian specialties such as mead, Samane moonshine, and Zalgris (a mead-based spirit); Vilniaus gatve 15
  • Dom Bow Ties—the only store in Lithuania devoted to hand-made bow ties; Stikliu gatve 6
  • Sauluva—a craft and toy store that sells handmade crafts made of amber, metal, ceramics, textiles, and other materials as well as unusual and educational toys; Literatu gatve 3
  • Lino Namai—a housewares store that sells linen from Siulas, the oldest flax mill in the country, that is known for high-quality table and bed linens; Vilnaius gatve 12
  • Lino Kopos—a designer’s shop that sells collections sewn exclusively from linen and accessories made from amber, wood, leather, and linen; Krokuvos gatve 6
  • Aukso Avis—a gallery established by a local fashion designer that sells bags, T-shirts, wall murals, and jewelry made from felt and wool; Pilies gatve 38
  • Lino ir Gintaro Studija—this studio sells gifts and souvenirs in linen, amber, precious metal, and other materials; Stikliu gatve 3
  • Zoraza—a fashion house that sells clothing and accessories in a variety of colors and textures such as suede, glitter, beads, felt, crystal, and leather; Stikliu gatve 9
  • Jonas Bugailiskis—a Lithuanian artist who designs unique items such as sculptures, ornate crosses, and musical instruments; Ausros Vartu gatve 17-10
  • Akropolis—a large shopping and entertainment complex with hundreds of stores, restaurants, a cinema, an ice-skating rink, and a children’s play area; Ozo gatve 25
  • Europa—a large shopping center across the Neris River with three floors of shops, restaurants, and cafes; Konstitucijos prospektas 7a
  • Kalvariju—a market that sells all sorts of goods including produce, livestock, and clothing; Kalvariju gatve 61
  • Ausros Vartu Meno Galerija—a souvenir shop with locally made souvenirs such as paintings, lace, and craft items; Ausros Vartu gatve 12
  • Akademine Knyga—an academic book store with fiction as well with some titles in English; Universiteto gatve 4
  • Ramune Piekautaite—a stylish boutique with locally designed business, casual, and bridal wear; Didzioji gatve 20
  • Humanitas—a bookstore stocked with art, design, architecture, and gift titles; Dominikonu gatve 5
  • Juozas Statkevicius—a prominent local clothing designer known for his modern fashion and costume designs; Pamenkalnio gatve 2-1

Shopping in Riga, Latvia

Riga has some unique shops, galleries, and shopping centers with a variety of stores that will appeal to any shopper. Here is just a sampling of the shops in Riga:

  • Central Market—a market hall with zeppelin hangars from World War I that has vendors selling produce, fruits, and vegetables; Negu iela 7
  • Art Nouveau Riga—an art nouveau souvenir and gift shop located in the midst of the art nouveau district; Strelnieku iela 9
  • Galerija Centrs—a modern shopping complex with stylish shops and restaurants; Audeju iela 16
  • Stockmann—a large department store spread out over four floors with men’s, women’s and children’s clothing and shoes as well as tableware, textiles, toys, appliances, cosmetics, a florist, grocery store, and deli; 13 Janvara Str. 8
  • Alfa Centrs—a Norwegian owned shopping mall that is the largest shopping center in Latvia with an H&M, a supermarket, and an Apple Store; Brivibas 372
  • Basteja Pasaza—a collection of European boutiques with high-quality and high-end clothing, shoes, and accessories stores; Valnu iela 12
  • Jana Rozes Gramatnica—named after and established by a famous Latvian publisher in the early 20th century who died in Siberia in 1942 and had his company nationalized until 1988 and in 1992 denationalized, this bookstore has Latvian books and books in English, German, French, Russian, Russian, and other languages; K. Barona 5
  • Ekovirtuve—an organic food store with locally produced food such as preservative-free organic produce and meats and a restaurant that serves organic, vegan, and vegetarian dishes; Rupniecibas iela 11
  • Proud 2B—a globally recognized brand with modern, comfortable, affordable, and basic clothing by designers; Dzirnavu iela 84
  • Apavi 40+–a women’s and men’s plus-size footwear store with shoes produced in Latvia, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Germany, France, the UK, and Finland; Kr. Valdemara street 38
  • Baltu Rotas (Baltic Jewelry)—owned by famed Latvian jewelers Inita and Vitauts Straupe, this gallery reproduces classic Baltic and Scandinavian designs as well as designs original pieces; Grecinieku iela 11-2
  • Bergs Bazaar—a shopping district with eclectic boutiques, furniture stores, an upscale hotel, an angling shop, and restaurants; Marijas iela 13/4
  • Globuss—a bookstore with English books, dictionaries, grammar texts, and English language literature; Dzirnavu iela 67
  • Domina—a shopping center with 110,000 square meters of clothing, footwear, and lifestyle apparel as well as a supermarket; Ieriku 3
  • Mols—an American-style mall with European chain stores and a food court; Krasta 46
  • Blow—a designer clothing store with names such as Alexander McQueen and Dolce and Gabbana at affordable prices; Barona iela 16
  • Medus Istaba—a small family-run business that sells honey, wax, and bee-related products; Peterbaznicas Str. 17
  • Hobbywool—a knitwear shop with knitted scarves, mittens, and garments; Maza Pils iela 6
  • Kalnciema Quarter Farmers Market—a farmer’s market with a variety of food stalls and craft vendors; Kalnciema iela 35
  • Robert’s Books—a secondhand English bookstore and café that hosts concerts, talks, and readings; Dzirnavu iela 51
  • Spice—a large mall with European brands such as H&M, Debenhams, and Zara, small stores, restaurants, and cafes; Lielirbes iela 29
  • Miesai—an independent design company from the Baltic region with simple everyday designs; Gertrudes iela 121
  • Glass Point—a glass art studio and shop that sells locally made artwork and designs; Pernavas Street 33
  • ETMO—a contemporary Latvian design shop with products for the home, clothing, and accessories; 4 Torna Street
  • RIIJA—a Latvian design boutique with a variety of products by Latvian designers such as bed linens, towels, clothing, furniture, tableware, and lighting fixtures; Terbatas iela 6/8
  • Manilla—a paper, stationery, and gift shop with home accessories, greeting cards, calligraphy items, toys, art supplies, and stationery; Terbatas iela 55
  • Chocolate No. 1—a chocolate café with chocolate products, hot chocolate, muffins, coffee, and a chocolatery; Blaumana iela 38/40
  • Cetras Zoles—a stylish discount clothing and shoe store; Terbatas iela 13
  • Dzenis Amber—an amber jeweler; Ratslaukums 7
  • Doma Antikvariats—an antique shop specializing in high-end antiques such as paintings, furniture, jewelry, icons, silver, porcelain, and antique medals; Smilsu iela 8
  • Love Riga—a Latvian souvenir shop with trinkets and other mementos; Audeju iela 5
  • Origo—a shopping center with name brands such as Nike and New Balance, clothing stores, bookstores, cafes, and restaurants; Stacijas laukums 2
  • EGLE Crafts Market—a crafts market with souvenirs, amber products, wooden goods, jewelry, wool, and leather goods; Kalku iela 1a
  • Page—a book store with a curated selection of books, magazines, writing tools, prints, and paper products; Miera iela 4
  • MusMaja (Our Home)—a souvenir shop with printed postcards and gift items; Kaleju Street 7
  • Boutique Maripol—a fur store with fur jackets, vests, and hats; Stabu iela 20

 

Shopping in Rome

Rome is not one of the most affordable cities to shop in but could be fun just to browse at designer ateliers and fashion houses and see if anything strikes your fancy. Here is just a sampling of the many stores you can check out during your trip to Rome:

  • A. Testoni—named after the brand’s founder and original designer, this shoe store sells his artistic and comfortable footwear for men and women as well as color-coordinated messenger bags; Via del Babuino 152
  • Ai Monasteri—a shop selling traditional items made by Italian friars and monks including liqueurs, herbal decoctions, toiletries, colognes for children, and jams; Corso del Rinascimento 72a
  • Al Sogno—a high-quality toy store with an emphasis on artistic and multisensory toys such as puppets, dolls, masks, stuffed animals, and illustrated books; Piazza Navona 53
  • Almost Corner Bookshop—a tiny bookshop with a great selection of books from best sellers to translated Italian classics; Via del Moro 45
  • Anglo-American Book Co.—an inviting English-language bookstore with over 45,000 books that has a varied selection including textbooks, fiction, and nonfiction; Via della Vite 102
  • Anteprima—a clothing store with African and Roma inspired clothing such as day and evening dresses and separates; Via delle Quattro Fontane 38-40
  • Antica Caciara Trasteverina—a deli with ham, salami, Sicilian anchovies, burrata cheese, and local wines; Via San Francesco a Ripa 140 a/b
  • Antica Erboristeria Romana—the oldest apothecary in Rome dating back to 1752 with teas and herbal infusions as well as essential oils, bud derivatives, and powdered extracts; Via Torre Argentina 15
  • Arsenale—run by designer Patrizia Pieroni, this high-end clothing store sells stylish overcoats, bustiers, and flowy dresses; Via del Pellegrino 172
  • Art Prive—a small jewelry shop run by designer Tiziana Salzano makes chunky multistrand torsade necklaces; Via Leonina 8
  • Bartolucci—a toy store with handmade items made from pine by a family that has been designing its products for over 60 years which include items such as cuckoo clocks, bookends, bedside lamps, wall hangings, and a child-size wooden vintage car; Via del Pastini 98
  • Berte—one of the oldest toy stores in Rome that carries a large selection of dolls, stuffed animals, Legos, and other collectibles; Piazza Navona 108
  • Borsalino Boutique—a haberdasher with distinguished fedoras that have been worn by movie stars such as Humphrey Bogart and Gary Cooper; Piazza del Popolo 20
  • Braccialini—this family-run handbag shop sells uniquely shaped bags such as little gold taxis, Santa Fe stagecoaches, appliqued leather beach bags, and themed creature bags; Via Mario De’Fiori 73
  • Brighenti—a sumptuous Italian clothing store with a marble floor and huge crystal chandelier suspended overhead and items such as silk nightgowns, pajamas, and vintage-inspired swimsuits; Via Frattina 7/8
  • Brioni—founded in 1945, this internationally renowned menswear designer is known for its custom-made suits worn by clients such as Clark Gable and Barack Obama; Via del Babuino 38/40
  • Buccone—a wine shop located in the former coach house of a Marquis that has 10 layers of shelves packed with wines and rare vintage wines as well as sweets, biscuits, and packaged candy; Via di Ripetta 19/20
  • Bulgari—a world-renowned jeweler that designs jewelry that is colorful, playful, and well-crafted; Via dei Condotti 10
  • Cartoleria Pantheon Dal 1910—a stationery shop with fine handmade paper, stock paper, artisanal sheets of handcrafted Amalfi paper, and hand-bound leather journals; Via della Rotonda 15
  • Castelli Profumerie—an Italian perfume shop with labels such as Acqua di Parma, Bois 1920, Bond No.9, and Comme de Garcons and a knowledgeable staff who really knows the store’s products; Via Frattina 18 and 54
  • Castroni—an international food shop with delicacies from around the world such as Twinings teas and exotic Spanish spices as well as a large variety of coffees, teas, and candies; Via Cola di Rienzo 196
  • Ceramiche Musa—a ceramic accent and tile store with tiles made in Vietri, a region known for its high-quality clays and traditional ceramics; Via di Campo Marzio 39
  • Cesari—a bridal clothing and home store with fabrics such as velvets, silks, cottons, damasks, and taffeta and a personalized line of bedspreads, tablecloths, lingerie, and embroidered linens; Via del Babuino 193
  • Coin—a department store with upscale designs including accessories, handbags, cosmetics, and clothes for men, women, and children as well as cookware items; Via Cola di Rienzo 173
  • Davide Cenci—a major Italian fashion designer known for impeccably tailored and custom-designed clothing that sells men’s and women’s clothing for a variety of occasions with items such as sailing sportswear and trench coats; Via Campo Marzio 1-7
  • Delfina Delettrez—a Roman designer who creates edgy accessories that are inspired by the human body that blend skulls, wild animals, and botanical elements in her jewelry; Via del Governo Vecchio 67
  • Eddy Monetti—an upscale men’s store that sells jackets, sweaters, slacks, and ties made of wool, cotton, and cashmere; Via Borgognona 36
  • Elena Miro—a high-end women’s plus clothing store that sells sophisticated clothing for women sizes 12 and up; Via Frattina 11-12
  • Enoteca Al Parlamento Achilli—located close to Montecitorio, the Italian Parliament building, this wine shop, restaurant, and food shop is popular with journalists and political figures; Via dei Prefetti 15
  • Ermenegildo Zegna—an internationally recognized men’s clothing designer of well-made suits; Via dei Condotti 58
  • Ex Libris—one of the oldest rare bookstores in Rome that is known for its selection of scholarly and collectible books from the 16th to 21st centuries including editions on art and architecture, music and theater, literature and humanities, maps, and prints; Via dell’Umilta 77/a
  • Fendi—an Italian fashion powerhouse since 1925 now owned by the Louis Vuitton group and once run by Karl Lagerfeld that is known for its collections mixing textures and fabrics; Largo Carlo Goldoni 419-421
  • Fratelli Rossetti—a shoe store known for its classically styled men’s and women’s leather shoes, loafers, and pumps; Via Borgognona 5/a
  • Frette—a bedding store that has been a major supplier of linens and towels for homes and hotels since 1860; Piazza di Spagna 11
  • Furla—a high-quality handbag store known for its affordable prices; Piazza di Spagna 22
  • Galassia—a women’s designer clothing store with stylish clothing by designers such as Gaultier, Vivienne Westwood, Issey Miyake, and Yamamoto; Via Frattina 20
  • Galleria Alberto Sordi—a beautiful covered shopping arcade opened in 1922 with sophisticated shops and cafes; Via del Corso 79
  • Giorgio Armani—a world renowned designer known for his silhouettes and deeply cut dresses and stylish menswear; Via dei Condotti 77-79
  • Gucci—one of the most glamorous labels in the world known for its classic styles and trendy clothing regularly worn by celebrities; Via dei Condotti 8
  • Hydra 2—a popular store for Italian teens and college students known for its statement pieces; Via Urbana 139
  • Ibiz-Artigianato In Cuoio—a father-daughter team that creates stylish leather handbags, belts, and sandals; Via dei Chiavari 39
  • Il Forum Termini—a shopping center located inside Rome’s largest train station, Stazione Termini, that has over 100 shops including Benetton, Nike, Mango, L’Occitane, Sephora, and bookstores with decent selections of English language classics and best sellers; Stazione Termini
  • Il Papiro—a paper shop that sells writing materials and hand-decorated papers made using a 17th century marbleized technique; Via del Pantheon 50
  • Il Sellaio Serafini Pelletteria—a family business known for its handmade leather bags, shoes, and belts; Via Caio Mario 14
  • Krizia—run by designer Mariuccia Mandelli, this clothing store has been run by many stylists over the years and is now back to its original style of clothing; Piazza di Spagna 87
  • L’ Anatra All’Arancia—a stylish clothing store that sells designer clothing by Marina Spadafora, Antik Batik, See by Chloe, and the store’s owner (Donatella Baroni) as well as perfumes and jewelry; Via Tiburtina 105
  • La Bottega del Cioccolata—a chocolatier that makes chocolate candies and treats; Via Leonina 82
  • La Citta del Sole—a toy store with fair-trade and eco-friendly toys along with classic and vintage toys arranged by age group such as puzzles, gadgets, books, and child-friendly toys; Via della Scrofa 65
  • La Feltrinelli—a major Italian bookstore with three floors of books including some in English, music, postcards, holiday items, and small gifts; Piazza Colonna 31/35
  • La Perla—a lingerie store with beautiful lingerie and underwear that is stylish and romantic; Via Bocce di Leone 28
  • La Rinascente—Italy’s most well-known department store that sells cosmetics, designer sportswear, handbags, and accessories; Galleria Alberto Sordi, Piazza Colonna
  • Laura Biagotti—a prominent Italian designer of cashmere pullovers, cardigans, and dresses as well as men’s and women’s perfumes; Via Mario de’Fiori 26
  • Le Gallinelle—a small boutique that sells classy retro-inspired clothing; Via Panisperna 61
  • Le IV Stagioni—a ceramics store with traditional Italian pottery, glazed pots, vases, and ceramic flower wall ornaments; Via dell’Umilta 30/b
  • Le Tartarughe—designer Susanna Liso’s clothing store that sells haute couture and ready to wear lines that mix fabrics such as raw silks or cashmeres and fine merino wool together; Via Pie di Marmo 17
  • Libreria IBS—a bookstore/café that is known for its discounted secondhand books and also sells a small selection of English paperbacks and DVDs; Via Nazionale 254-255
  • Libreria del Viaggiatore—a small bookstore that sells guidebooks, maps, travel journals, and poetry from around the world in English, French, and Italian; Via del Pellegrino 165
  • MMM-Massimo Maria Melis—a jeweler who is known for incorporating ancient Roman and Etruscan designs into his jewelry and frequently using antique coins in his bracelets and necklaces; Via dell’Orso 57
  • Mado—a top vintage designer of eccentric and unique dresses, gowns, and other clothing pieces; Via del Governo Vecchio 89/a
  • Marisa Padovan—a destination for custom lingerie and bathing suits; Via delle Carrozze 81-82
  • Mikiway—an eclectic clothing, jewelry, and accessories store with designs by up-and-coming Italian fashion designers; Via del Boschetto 40b
  • Mimmo Siviglia—a tailor known for his custom-made dress shirts and attentive customer service; Via Urbana 14a
  • Missoni—a family-run internationally recognized label that has bohemian knit designs with patterns such as zigzags, waves, and stripes, elegant evening attire, and swimsuits; Piazza di Spagna 78
  • Moriondo E Gariglio—a family business recognized for its chocolate delicacies made from family recipes that have been passed down from generation to generation; Via Pie di Marmo 21
  • Murano Piu—a shop famous for its handblown Venetian glass pieces including Murano jewelry, tableware, vases, and chandeliers; Corso Rinascimento 53/55
  • Patrizia Pepe—a clothing store that sells trendy fashions such as jeans, jackets with oversize lapels, and high heels; Via Frattina 44
  • Pifebo—a popular vintage clothing store with a great selection of clothing from the 70s, 80s, and 90s; Via dei Serpenti 141
  • Pinco Pallino—a children’s clothing store with nice clothing for boys and girls as well as a cute line for babies and toddlers; Via Vittoria 35
  • Pineider—an exclusive stationery store opened in 1774 that uses fine Florentine leather for its wallets, briefcases, and desk accessories; Via di Fontanella Borghese 22
  • Prada—a clothing, handbags, lingerie, and accessories label renowned for its blend of European luxury with modern finesse; Via dei Condotti 88/90 (men’s) and 92/95 (women’s)
  • Pure Sermoneta—a designer clothing store for children ages newborn to 12 with labels such as Fendi, Diesel, Dior, Juicy Couture, Nolita, and Miss Blumarine; Via Frattina 111
  • Quattrocolo—an historic shop opened in 1938 that showcases micro-mosaic jewelry crafted in the style perfected by artisans at the Vatican mosaic studio as well as 18th and 19th century cameo and engraved stones; Via della Scrofa 48
  • Rachele—a small children’s clothing store run by a Swedish designer who makes only two of each item for toddlers up to age 12; Vicolo del Bollo 6-7
  • Renard—a leather boutique that creates its leather blazers, trench coats, and skirts from leathers tanned with natural extracts; Via dei Due Macelli 53
  • Replay—a casual-chic clothing store for young adults with jeans and T-shirts with American sports teams emblazoned on them; Via della Rotonda 24
  • SBU—a menswear fashion label popular with celebrities and members of the A-list that sells jeans, casual apparel, shoes, and sportswear; Via di San Pantaleo 68-69
  • Saddlers Union—a pricey Italian handbag store known for their leather handbags made on-site supervised by one of the shop’s original artisans; Via Margutta 11
  • Salvatore Ferragamo—a major fashion label internationally recognized for its footwear that also sells handbags, leather goods, men’s and women’s clothing, scarves, and ties; Via dei Condotti 65 (men’s) and 73/74 (women’s)
  • Save the Queen—a beautiful clothing store with exotic and creative clothing for women with frills, cutouts, and textures; Via del Babuino 49
  • Savelle Arte E Tradizione—a family business that sells religious gifts and trinkets and specializes in rosaries, crosses, religious artwork, statues, and papal memorabilia; Via Paolo VI 27
  • Schostal—a clothing store that sells fine-quality shirts, underwear, and handkerchiefs made of wool and cashmere; Via Fontanella Borghese 29
  • Society—the flagship store for Limonta, one of the most famous and historic Italian textile brands that uses rare and desirable fabrics to give their designs a vintage appearance; Piazza di Pasquino 4
  • Spazio IF—run by designers Irene and Carlo Ferrara, this clothing store works with unique designers and artists with an emphasis on Sicilian designs such as hand-cut handbags, swimsuits, designer textiles, jewelry, and sportswear; Via dei Coronari 44a
  • Superga—a shoe store known for its classic sneakers in a variety of colors and a popular model worn by celebrities such as Katie Holmes and Kelly Brook; Via delle Vite 86
  • Taro—a clothing store that sells handmade knitwear made from rare yarns and bold colors such as tunics, sleeveless jackets, shawls, and pants; Via di Ripetta 144
  • Tebro—a classic Roman department store that specializes in household linens and sleepwear; Via dei Prefetti 48
  • Tod’s—a global shoe powerhouse known for its simple and classic designs; Via Fontanella di Borghese 56a-57
  • Trimani Vinai a Roma Dal 1821—a wine and spirits store with one of Rome’s largest selections of Italian wines as well as champagne, spumante, grappa, and liqueurs; Via Goito 20
  • Valentino—an Italian fashion powerhouse known for its shoes, gowns, and accessories; Via dei Condotti 15
  • Versace—the flagship store of the international label with Byzantine-inspired mosaic floors and futuristic interiors as well as its clothing, apparel, jewelry, watches, fragrances, cosmetics, and home furnishings; Piazza di Spagna 12
  • Vestiti Usati Cinzia—a vintage clothing store with fun 60s and 70s apparel, sunglasses, shoes, and accessories; Via del Governo Vecchio 45

Shopping in Reykjavik

Reykjavik does not have a wealth of shops to explore but the ones that the city does have  seem interesting and unique.

  • 12 Tonar—both a record shop and an independent record label that has a café and sells music by popular Icelandic artists such as Bjork, Agent Fresco, FM Belfast, and Dikta; Skolavoraustigur 15
  • Anna Maria Design—a workshop and store that sells a variety of jewelry for men and women made from materials that include silver, gold, and Icelandic stones; Skolavoraustigur 3
  • Gallery Fold—an art gallery that has a large selection of prints, drawings, paintings, and sculptures by modern Icelandic artists and older Icelandic art; Rauaararstigur 12-14
  • Handprjonassambandid—the Handknitting Association of Iceland’s outlet selling hand-knit items of various kinds; Skolavoraustigur 19
  • Islandia—a store that sells woolen items, gifts, and souvenirs; Kringlan Mall
  • JS Watch Co—the official watch of the Icelandic Coast Guard and a celebrity favorite and a watchmaker that sells nicely crafted timepieces; Laugavegur 62
  • Kormakur and Skjoldur—a men’s store that sells men’s clothing and hair accessories with brands such as Bertie and Wooster’s of London which sells threads, cuff links, and designer clothing; Harris Tweed; and Ben Sherman; Laugavegur 59
  • Kringlan Mall—a mall with a variety of decent clothing stores, a movie theater, and souvenir shops; Kringlun 4-12
  • Kronkron—owned by an Icelandic couple who are known for their designer footwear in all sorts of colors and silk clothing; Laugavegur 63b
  • Lucky Records—a record store that has the largest collection of vintage and contemporary vinyl in Iceland and also has performances by underground and new alternative bands; Rauaararstigur 10
  • Smaralind—one of Iceland’s two major shopping malls located in Kopavogur, a neighboring community, that has the British-based Debenhams and Iceland’s hypermarket chain store, Hagkaup; Hagasmara 1