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Shopping in London

I’m guessing that shopping in London must be a pastime in itself with the variety of stores and renowned institutions such as Harrods and Fortnum and Mason. I think the following list should further prove my point that shopping should be on your checklist if you think about visiting London

  • A. Gold—sells traditional and retro food products including gift baskets, picnic hampers, take-out sandwiches, salads, homemade cakes, and daily specials; 42 Brushfield Street
  • Benjamin Pollock’s Toyshop—a London landmark that sells retro toys including antique model theaters, puppets, marionettes, teddy bears, tops, jack-in-the-boxes, and other types of toys; 44 The Market Building
  • Berry Brothers and Rudd—a wine emporium that has been family-run since 1698 that stores more than 4,000 vintage bottles and casks of wine as well as a whiskey room; 3 St. James’s Street
  • Books for Cooks—an intriguing store where lunch dishes are served daily from a test kitchen from recipes in the 8,000 cookbooks on the shelves; 4 Blenheim Crescent
  • Columbia Road Flower Market—a popular London flower market that has more than 50 stalls selling flowers, shrubs, bulbs, and trees (it is only open on Sundays); Columbia Road
  • Fenwick—a large department store selling affordable clothing in an upscale neighborhood with accessories, cosmetics, perfumes, and clothes by niche and popular designers and a men’s department in the basement; 163 New Bond Street
  • Fortnum and Mason—an upscale department store selling foods such as teas, preserves, condiments, and wine as well as housewares, men’s and women’s accessories and toiletries, candles, jewelry, and clothing and toys for kids; 181 Piccadilly
  • Foyles—a landmark London bookstore is housed in a 1930s art deco building with more than 200,000 books on its four miles of bookshelves known particularly for textbooks and foreign language titles; 107 Charing Cross Road
  • Hamleys—the oldest toy store in the world that has six floors of the latest toys such as dolls, soft toys, video games, and tech products as well as train sets, drum kits, and magic tricks; 188-196 Regent Street
  • Harrods—a London institution of a department store that has more than 300 departments and 30 eateries set on a 4.5-acre site with foods, perfumes, jewelry, Europe’s biggest shoe department, designer clothing, and designer kids’ clothing; 87-135 Brompton Road
  • Hostem—a men’s and women’s clothing store that sells casual and edgy fashions and shoes; 41-43 Redchurch Street
  • Liberty—a department store established in the 19th century that sells home products, leather bags, beauty products, perfumes, footwear, and high-quality men’s and women’s clothing as well as a florist, hair salon, traditional men’s barber, beauty treatment rooms, and a spa; Regent Street
  • Peckham Rye—a family-run men’s accessories and clothing store; 11 Newburgh Street
  • Persephone Books—a bookstore selling fiction and nonfiction works by female authors as well as reprints of 20th century works from mainly female authors; 59 Lamb’s Conduit Street
  • Peter Jones—a London institution since 1937 that sells bed and bath linens, ceramics, glassware, beauty products, kitchenware, appliances, tech products, a florist, clothing, shoes, and accessories; Sloane Square
  • Selfridges—the second largest store in the UK after Harrods that sells both affordable and expensive designer clothing, jewelry, audio equipment, and has the world’s largest shoe department, a rooftop restaurant, tea, and an art-house movie theater; 400 Oxford Street
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Sights in London

London has been a city that has enticed me since I was younger and remains a place I am definitely interested in visiting someday. Many of the attractions in London are world renowned and there is a wealth of history to learn about during a trip there.

  • Apsley House—a historic landmark that was formerly the home of the Duke of Wellington in the 1770s that has remained within his family until the 7th Duke of Wellington gave the house to his country; the home has weapons and military weapons as well as a great art collection with works by artists such as Brueghel, Van Dyck, and Rubens; 149 Piccadilly, Hyde Park Corner
  • British Museum—one of the signature museums in the world with countless marvels on display including the Rosetta Stone; Elgin Marbles; pieces of the Mausoleum of Halikarnassos; Mildenhall Treasure; and Sutton Hoo treasure with helmets and jewelry; also included are Egyptian mummies, an exhibit on living and dying, and other artifacts to admire; Great Russell Street
  • Buckingham Palace—the Queen’s main home open to the public only in August and September with a tour that includes 19 state rooms with gilt moldings and artistic masterpieces, a throne room with the 1953 coronation throne, the state dining room, and the sword in the ballroom used to bequeath knighthoods and other honors; Buckingham Palace Road
  • Chiswick House—a beautiful mansion finished in 1729 by the 3rd Earl of Burlington with gorgeous rooms including the Blue Velvet room with elegant décor and an intricately painted ceiling set amidst sprawling grounds with classical temples, statues, obelisks, a café, and a children’s play area; Burlington Lane
  • Dulwich Picture Gallery—the world’s first specifically designated art museum opened in 1811 with a permanent exhibition including works by Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Poussin, and Gainsborough along with major temporary exhibitions annually; Gallery Road
  • Eltham Palace—a former favorite home of Henry VIII that has been renovated twice, once during the 15th and 16th centuries and once during the 1930s that is a combination of medieval grandeur and art deco with a map room and walk-in wardrobe with 1930s dresses; Court Road
  • Geffrye Museum of the Home—a museum dedicated to the lives of London’s middle class that has 11 rooms that show home interiors from the Elizabethan period to the present day with a series of gardens outside that shows how the town garden evolved over the years and 20th century galleries, a café by the gardens, and a shop; 136 Kingsland Road
  • Houses of Parliament—referred to as the Palace of Westminster, this is where members of Parliament (MPs) debate one another and pose questions to the Prime Minister; St. Stephen’s Entrance, St. Margaret Street
  • Hyde Park—the renowned 350-acre park that originally was used as Henry VIII’s hunting grounds now used by the Household Cavalry who reside in the Hyde Park barracks that is great for walking, biking, or relaxing by the Serpentine, its body of water near its southern border
  • Kew Gardens—also known as the Royal Botanic Gardens, this UNESCO World Heritage Site is home to more than 30,000 species of plants from around the world with temples, a conservatory that houses 10 climate zones, and a treetop walkway; Kew Road at Lichfield Road
  • London Eye—built in the late 1990s to celebrate the new millennium, this giant Ferris wheel was the largest cantilevered observation wheel at the time of its construction and is one of London’s tallest structures and allows riders to see 25 miles of scenery; Jubilee Gardens
  • Museum of London—a museum that houses more than 7,000 objects ranging from Oliver Cromwell’s death mask to an original door from Newgate Prison with great gems and galleries that depict the history of London from ancient times to the present; London Wall
  • National Gallery—one of the world’s signature art museums with more than 2,300 masterpieces on display including works by Michelangelo, Da Vinci, Turner, Monet, Van Gogh, Picasso, and others with special exhibitions every year; Trafalgar Square
  • National Portrait Gallery—founded in 1885, this gallery consists of more than 150 years of British photographs and 160,000 portraits of famous and infamous British citizens arranged chronologically from Tudor times to modern Britain with temporary exhibitions on the first three floors and the Portrait Restaurant on the top floor that provides a great view of London below; St. Martin’s Place
  • Natural History Museum—one of the world’s most famous museums of natural history and earth sciences with more than 70 million specimens and exhibits including a Dinosaur Gallery, Earth Galleries, Volcanoes and Earthquake Gallery, and more to admire and learn about; Cromwell Road
  • Science Museum—an illuminating science museum with educational exhibits where children can do hands-on science experiments and explore six floors that delve into physics, astronomy, aeronautics, the Internet, and robotics; Exhibition Road
  • Paul’s Cathedral—the architectural masterpiece of a cathedral built over a 35-year span in the late 16th century with a Whispering Gallery where you can whisper something to one wall and hear it clearly from 107 feet away and the Stone and Golden Galleries which offer great views of London; St. Paul’s Churchyard
  • Strawberry Hill—a hodge-podge of architecture with a medieval exterior and Gothic cathedral-like interior that was recently restored in 2011 after being abandoned for years with gardens restored to their original 18th century design; 268 Waldegrave Road
  • Tower of London—the classic former prison with 20 towers that has private secrets of royalty etched into its walls home to beheadings, murders, the Armouries (a collection of arms and armor), and the Crown Jewels in the Waterloo Barracks; Tower Hill
  • Victoria and Albert Museum—a museum dedicated to practical arts with many collections arranged by category including textiles, sculpture, jewelry, and fashion as well as galleries such as the British Galleries devoted to art and design from 1500 to 1900, the Asian Galleries home to a great collection of samurai armor, and Medieval and Renaissance Galleries; Cromwell Road
  • V&A Museum of Childhood—home to one of the world’s largest toy collections with dollhouses, board games, puzzles, teddy bears, train sets, and others in this outpost of the Victoria and Albert Museum; Cambridge Heath Road
  • Wallace Collection—an art museum with a great collection of old master paintings with works by artists such as Rubens, Rembrandt, and Van Dyck as well as collections of furniture, porcelain, and pottery; Hertford House, Manchester Square
  • Westminster Abbey—the iconic abbey that is a London landmark that has been the site of 38 coronations and 16 royal weddings with chapels, tombs, shrines, poets’ tombs, and memorials; Broad Sanctuary
  • ZSL London Zoo—a zoo with a focus on education, wildlife conservation, and breeding of endangered species with diverse animals from tigers to millipedes and a children’s zoo with mongooses, llamas, sheep, and goats; Outer Circle

Shopping in Copenhagen

Copenhagen is a small shopping destination with Scandinavia’s largest mall and largest department store. There are a number of department stores, renowned designer stores, and popular chains.

  • Bang and Olufsen—a renowned designer of high-tech headphones and devices; Ostergade 18
  • Bruuns Bazaar—a clothing store with original designs and high-end designers such as Gucci; Kronprinsensg 8
  • Field’s—the largest mall in Scandinavia with more than 140 stores and a whole floor dedicated to food, entertainment, and play; next to Orestad Metro Station
  • Galleri K—a designer clothing store with popular Danish designers; Centrum
  • Georg Jensen—one of the most recognized international silver jewelers; Amagertorv 4
  • Hay House—a popular designer of modern Danish furniture; Ostergade 61, 2nd floor
  • House of Amber—a store selling amber jewelry and other objects; Kongens Nytorv 2
  • Illum—a department store that has a rooftop café and basement grocery store; Ostergade 52
  • Illums Bolighus—a contemporary design store with art glass, porcelain, silverware, carpets, and fun toys for adults; Amagertov 19
  • Dansk Mobelkunst—a furniture store with vintage furniture and artwork by Arne Jacobson, Kaare Klint, and Finn Juhl; Aldersrogade 6C, Norrebro
  • Fisketorvet Shopping Center—a popular mall with 100 shops including chains such as Mango and H&M, shoe stores, and jewelry, watch, and stereo retailers and a large number of fast-food choices; Havneholmen 5, Centrum
  • Magasin—Scandinavia’s largest department store with a high-quality basement marketplace; Kongens Nytorv 13
  • Munthe Plus Simonsen—a clothing brand with playful and expensive Danish designs; Gronnegade 10, Centrum
  • Royal Copenhagen—the flagship store for the designer of its well-known porcelain ware and settings with a museum on the second floor where painters can be seen in action; Amargertov 6, Centrum

Sights in Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark which is said to be one of the world’s happiest countries. It has great museums, castles, an observatory, a zoo, a world-renowned theme park, and other interesting attractions.

  • Christiansborg Slot—a compound that was used as the royal residence from 1441 until a fire in 1795 and is now where the queen receives guests as well as the home of the parliament and the prime minister’s office; Slotsholmen
  • Amalienborg—four identical rococo buildings that have been home to Danish royalty since 1784 and is the queen’s winter residence and is also where some of the Royal Collection is housed; Christian VIII Palace, Amalienborg Place, Frederiksstaden
  • Botanical Garden (Botanisk Have)—a 25-acre garden with trees, flowers, ponds, sculptures, and a 19th century Palm House of tropical and subtropical plants along with an observatory and a geology museum; Oster Farimagsgade 2B
  • Frihedsmuseet (Resistance Museum)—a museum with moving displays that commemorate the Danish resistance movement during WWII that saved 7,000 Jews from the Nazis; Churchillparken
  • Kongelige Bibliotek (Royal Library)—a grand building with more than 2 million books including stories of Viking journeys to America and Greenland and original manuscripts by Hans Christian Andersen and Isak Dinesen as well as the new Black Diamond addition which has temporary history exhibits featuring books, manuscripts, and artifacts from the library and the National Museum of Photography which contains temporary exhibitions; Soren Kierkegaards Place I
  • Museum of Decorative Art (Kunstindustrimuseet)—a beautiful building which is home to European and Asian crafts as well as ceramics, silverware, tapestries, and special exhibits focusing on contemporary design; Bredgade 68
  • Nationalmuseet (National Museum)—one of the best national museums in Europe set within an 18th century royal residence that includes permanent exhibits focusing on Danish cultural history from prehistoric to modern times with a significant collection of Stone age tools; Egyptian, Greek, and Roman antiquities; and an exhibit on Viking times; Fredericksholms Kanal 12
  • NY Carlsberg Glyptotek—an important museum in Copenhagen with antiquities and Impressionist masterpieces set amidst an indoor garden along with Egyptian and Greek pieces and Europe’s finest collection of Roman portraits; Dantes Place 7
  • Rosenborg Slot—a castle that has ballrooms, hall, and reception chambers and thousands of objects to admire including beer glasses, gilded clocks, golden swords, family portraits, and more; Oster Voldgade 4A
  • Tivoli—Copenhagen’s best-known attraction that attracts four million people from mid-April to mid-September with rides, a pantomime theater, open-air stage, 38 restaurants, and frequent concerts; Vesterbrogade 3
  • Arbejdermuseet (Workers’ Museum)—a museum that depicts the lives of the working class from 1870 to the present with life-size re-creations of city streets, apartments, and rotating exhibits on Danish and international social issues and includes a 19th century style café and beer hall and a 1950s style coffee shop; Romersgade 22
  • Dansk Arkitektur Center (Danish Architecture Center)—an architectural center that is located within a wharf-side warehouse built in 1880 that has rotating exhibitions that cover trends and trendsetters in architecture and architectural design; Strandgade 27B, Christianshavn
  • Dansk Jodisk Museum (Danish Jewish Museum)—located within a wing of the Royal Library, this museum has objects that are of interest to both Jewish and non-Jewish visitors such as paintings, prints, jewelry, scrapbooks, and films as well as extensively covering the Danish resistance movement during WWII that helped bring nearly all of Denmark’s 7,000 Jews safely to Sweden; Proviantpassegen 6, Centrum
  • Kastellet—an active military fortification within Churchill Park that has walking paths, grazing sheep, and greenery; Kastellet 68, Osterbro
  • Kobenhavns Bymuseum (Copenhagen City Museum)—an 18th century building that has a collection depicting Copenhagen’s history with a well-kept model of 16th century Copenhagen in front of the building; Vesterbrogade 59, Vesterbro
  • Nikolaj Kirke—the former Nicholas Church named after the patron saint of seafarers that was originally built in the 13th century and was destroyed in a fire in 1795 with the current structure finished in 1914; it is now a contemporary art gallery; Nikolaj Place 10, Centrum
  • Rundetarn (Round Tower)—a tower that provides a panoramic view of the winding streets and crooked roofs of Copenhagen and was built as an observatory in 1642 by Christian IV and is still maintained for that purpose; the site also includes an art gallery with rotating exhibits, an observatory, and a telescope; Kobmagergade 52A, Centrum
  • Statens Museum for Kunst—an art museum with paintings by Rubens, Rembrandt, Titian, El Greco, and Fragonard, antique and 20th century Danish art, and a modern art collection with works by Henri Matisse, Edvard Munch, Henri Laurens, and Georges Braque as well as a children’s museum with shows for different age groups; Solvgade 48-50, Frederiksstaden
  • Tojhusmuseet (Royal Danish Arsenal Museum)—a Renaissance structure built by King Christian IV that has displays of uniforms, weapons, and armor in a 600-foot-long arched hall; Tojhusg 3, Centrum

Shopping in Prague

Prague is an interesting shopping destination with markets, craft stores, clothing stores from local and international designers, and boutiques. Below is just a sampling of the multitude of stores in Prague worth checking out:

  • Artel—a store that sells handcrafted items that combine modern styles with Czech techniques; Celetna 29
  • Bric a Brac—an antiques shop that sells a variety of goods such as Communist-era badges, typewriters, signs, and more; Tynska 7
  • Czech Labels and Friends—a clothing store that sells clothes by Czech and Slovakian designers with bright colors, classic shapes, and graphic tees; Zelezna 12
  • Leeda—an artsy clothing store with original Czech designs including silk skirts and painted dresses; Bartolomejska 1
  • Absintherie—an absinthe shop with a bar for tastings and an on-site museum with old advertisements, posters, bottles, and absinthe spoons; Jilska 7
  • Alice Abraham—a Czech designer who is known for dramatic designs, animal prints, and deep cuts; Vezenska 3
  • Analogue—a photography store with a staff that has a wealth of knowledge about analog photography, Lomography cameras, Polaroids, and more as well as a public darkroom, exhibitions, and a lab; Vlasska 357/10
  • Anima Tua—a high-end clothing store with Italian designers such as Elisabetta Franchi and Fendi; Elisky Krasnohorske 13/3
  • Anne Fontaine—a Parisian-style clothing shop run by a French designer who is known for black and white blouses; Masna 12
  • Antikvariat Karel Krenek—a shop with a large collection of antique maps, prints, and engravings dating from the 16th century including Japanese woodblocks and a map depicting Asia as Pegasus; Narodni 18
  • Art Deco Galerie—a vintage shop with Art Deco-era sculptures and furnishings as well as intricate brooches, turban headbands, and silk scarves; Michalska 21
  • Atrium Flora—a shopping mall with hard to find designers such as Iron First and Kara and an IMAX theater; Vinohradska 151
  • Bat’a—a five-level shoe store that is a global chain but originated in the Czech Republic and sells all types of shoes from sandals to boat shoes; Vaclavske nam. 6
  • Beata Rajska—a clothing store with great formalwear; Dlouha 3
  • Belda Shop—a jewelry shop that resembles a gallery with curated sculptures and accessories; Mikulandska 10
  • Beltissimo—a high-end shoe store with designers such as Marc Jacobs and Camper; U Prasne brany
  • Bliss Farm Gallery—an open art studio and shop that sells paintings, silkscreen printed T-shirts, and stuffed animals with handmade products from recycled materials; Cajkovskeho 1716/22
  • Boheme—a clothing store with designs by Czech designer Hana Stocklassa that include knitwear or paper-clip collared shirts; Dusni 8
  • Bontonland Megastore—an underground music store that is known for its selection of Czech music and films; Palac Koruna, Vaclavske nam 1
  • Botanicus—an organic bath and body shop with soaps crafted from fruits, vegetables, and herbs on a rural Czech farm; Tynsky Dvur 3
  • Cihelna Concept Store—a design concept shop that showcases Czech designs such as unique chairs and inventive lighting; Cihelna 2B
  • Coccinelle Accessories—an Italian handbag store with floral-patterned scarves as well; U Obecniho domu 2
  • DNB—a clothing store located close to the river run by Czech designer Denisa Nova that sells slouchy denim, tunic-length silk T-shirts, and colorful garments; Naprstkova 4
  • Dusni3—a modern clothing store with women’s designers such as Vivienne Westwood and Mellow Yellow shoes; Dusni 3
  • Dum Hudebnich Nastroju—a musical instrument store with everything from brass instruments to bongos; Stefanikova 19
  • Ermenegildo Zegna—a menswear store with tailored suits, zip-front jackets, trainers, colognes, and sunglasses; U Prasne brany 3
  • Galerie Antikvariat Ztichla Klika—a huge bookstore with rare books, old books, modern works, art, photographs, and paintings; Betlemska 10-14
  • Globe Bookstore and Coffeehouse—a bookstore with English-language titles and a café; Pstrossova 6
  • Granat Turnov—a store part of the Granat Co-op, the world’s most significant producer of Bohemian garnet jewelry such as gold and silver jewelry; Dlouha 30
  • Halada—a German jeweler that specializes in pearls and gold, silver, and platinum pieces; Parizska 7
  • Havelska—an outdoor market that sells souvenirs, seasonal items, handmade jewelry, and fresh fruits and vegetables; Havelska
  • Hudy Sport—a bi-level outdoor store with hiking, camping, and rock-climbing equipment from brands such as North Face as well as backpacks, laptop bags, and water bottles; Na Perstyne 14
  • Humanic—a reasonably priced Austrian chain that sells trendy shoes like bright flip-flops and stilettos; OC Novy Smichov, Plzenska 8
  • Ingredients—a stylish boutique run by two Czechs that sells rare perfumes, skin-care products, and candles and features an onsite aromatherapy and treatment center; Jachymova 2
  • Intersport—a huge outdoor store with equipment for a variety of sports including rock climbing and roller hockey; Na Prikope 21
  • Ivana Follova—a small boutique at the top of Wenceslas Square that specializes in silk clothing such as wedding dresses and coats and costume jewelry; Mezibranska 9
  • JHB Starozitnosi—a shop with clocks from the 18th and 19th centuries that originated in Austria, the Czech Republic, France, and Germany, antique pocket watches, art deco and art nouveau diamond rings, porcelain and brass décor, and furniture; Panska 1
  • Kenzo—a French and Japanese clothing designer whose clothing is relaxed and comfortable including billowy dresses and tops with tribal and floral patterns; Namesti Republiky 5
  • Kiwi Travel Bookshop—a bookstore with over 17,000 items in stock specializing in travel with English travel guides, local maps, books about travel, and globes; Jungmannova 23
  • Klara Nademlynska—a boutique run by a Czech designer with clothing that features unusual draping, animal prints, and necklaces; Dlouha 3
  • Kubista—a museum shop located on the ground floor of the House at the Black Madonna that has original and replica Cubist art and sells maps of Prague’s art deco, Cubist, and modern architecture; Ovocny trh 19
  • Leeda—an artsy shop with unique Czech designs from painted dresses to billowy silk skirts; Bartolomejska 1
  • Manufaktura—a business established in 1991 to preserve traditional Czech and Moravian crafts that has locations across the country with this location selling home-spa products such as bath salts, creams, and unique cosmetics made with Czech beer; Celetna 12
  • Masna Na Kozim Placku—a food shop that sells bread, meat, and cheese and resembles an 18th century food shop; Kozi 9
  • Mucha Museum Shop—a shop dedicated to Alfons Mucha, a world-famous Czech artist who was known for his paintings of Sarah Bernhardt, that sells posters, postcards, calendars, glass, jewelry, scarves, books, and lamps all with Mucha motifs; Kaunicky palac, Panska 7

Sights in Prague, Czech Republic

Prague is another historic city with a number of palaces, great museums, parks, vibrant neighborhoods, and memorials. It seems to be a very interesting city worth visiting.

  • Old Town Square—a bustling square surrounded by beautifully designed Baroque buildings, cafes, street entertainers, and craftspeople; 110 00 Praha 1
  • Vitus Cathedral—situated in the Prague Castle, this cathedral is the most significant and largest church in Prague that was the burial site of former Czech kings and home to the Czech Crown Jewels; Prague Castle
  • Prague Zoo—one of the top zoos in the world opened in 1931 with 4,600 animals and 680 species including 12 pavilions and 150 exhibits that include animals such as Asian elephants, giant Chinese salamanders, antelopes, giraffes, gharials, and gorillas; U Trojskeho Zamku 3/120
  • Prague Castle—the largest castle in Europe with over 700 rooms
  • Spanish Synagogue, Jewish Museum—home to permanent exhibitions that deal with the history of Jews in Bohemian lands from the 1780s to the post-WWII era and important Jewish entrepreneurs, scientists, writers, musicians, and artists along with more than 200 valuable silver artifacts; Vezenska 141/1
  • National Memorial to the Heroes of the Heydrich Terror—a museum that tells the story of Czech paratroopers defeated by 700 Nazi soldiers after killing an SS leader during WWII; Resslova 307/9a
  • National Gallery in Prague—an art museum with works from Czech artists and international masters such as Picasso, Van Gogh, Monet, and Rodin; Staromestske namesti 12
  • Basilica of St. Peter and St. Paul—a beautiful cathedral with an amazing view from the top; Rotunde 10, Vysehrad Fortress
  • Waldstein Palace—the home of the Czech Senate that was once a palace for royalty; Valdshtejnske namesti 17/4
  • Botanicka Zahrada—a public garden near Prague Zoo with a path that first takes you through a desert-like environment, through a tunnel under a rain forest, and into a room where there are plants found in tropical mountains; Trojska 196
  • Charles Bridge—Prague’s signature monument where you have amazing views of the towers and domes of the Lesser Quarter and the spires of St. Vitus’s Cathedral
  • Bazilika Svateho Jiri (St. George’s Basilica)—the best-preserved Romanesque church in the Czech Republic with a 12th-century interior that includes stone walls and small arched windows; Nam. U sv. Jiri
  • Clam-Gallas Palac (Clam-Gallas Palace)—designed by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, a Viennese baroque architect, this palace was constructed during a span of sixteen years and is now a state archive with occasional temporary art exhibitions and concerts; Husova 20
  • Franz Kafka Museum—a museum dedicated to the works of Franz Kafka, author of The Metamorphosis, who was a German author that lived in Prague almost his entire life, and the museum features facsimiles of manuscripts, documents, first editions, photographs, and newspaper obituaries displayed in glass vitrines; Hergetova Cihelna
  • Jan Hus Monument—a monument dedicated in 1915 500 years after Hus was burned at the stake in Germany that has been the subject of some controversy because its style clashes with the other styles of the square in which it is situated but still honors his ability to transform doctrinal disagreements into common language; Staromestske nam
  • Prague Jewish Museum—a museum that consists of six Jewish monuments: the Maisel Synagogue, the Pinkas Synagogue, the Spanish Synagogue, the Klaus Synagogue, the Ceremonial Hall, and the Old Jewish Cemetery; Reservation Centre, Maiselova 15
  • Municipal House—a restored home designed in the Art Nouveau style with a restaurant and café as well as richly decorated halls to explore upstairs; the home was the former site of the Royal Court, the seat of Bohemia’s kings from 1383 to 1483, and has a mosaic above the entrance “Homage to Prague” that is situated between sculptures representing the oppression and rebirth of the Czechs; namesti Republiky 5
  • Strahov Library—the largest monastic library in the Czech Republic that has two baroque halls that date from the 17th and 18th centuries but are no longer open to the public and feature floor to ceiling walnut shelving, ceiling frescoes, and ceiling embellishments; Strahovske nadvori 1
  • Loreta—a pilgrimage site founded by Benigna Katerina Lobkowicz in 1626 and designed as a replica of the Santa Casa (Sacred House, the home of Mary, mother of Jesus) in the holy land with the replica situated in the center of a courtyard complex surrounded by arcades, churches, and cathedrals; Loretanske namesti 7
  • National Monument—a large monument-museum dedicated to Klement Gottwald, the country’s first president, with a central hall home to marble sarcophagi that once were home to the remains of notable Communists and a war memorial with sculptures by Jan Stursa that features exhibits recounting the founding of the Czech Republic in 1918, World War II, the 1948 coup, and the Soviet invasion of 1968; U Pamatniku 1900
  • Convent of St. Agnes—located in the northeastern corner of Stare Mesto, this is the former convent of St. Agnes that is Prague’s oldest surviving Gothic building and now home to the National Gallery’s permanent collection of medieval and early Renaissance art from 1200-1550 from Bohemia and Central Europe; U Milosrdnych 17
  • Petrin—one of Prague’s largest green spaces that is a high hill with a lookout tower and mirror maze on top of the hill and also has the Kinsky Garden where the 18th century Church of St. Michael is situated
  • Mucha Museum—an interesting museum home to the art-nouveau posters, paintings, and decorative panels of Alfons Mucha as well as sketches, photographs, and other memorabilia; Panska 7
  • Nicholas Church—one of Central Europe’s finest baroque structures which has a ceiling fresco by Johann Kracker, Apotheosis of St. Nicholas, that is Europe’s largest fresco; the church itself was completed in 1755 and in 1787 Mozart played the pipe organ there and was honored with a requiem mass in 1791; Malostranske namesti 38
  • Prague City Museum—a great museum opened in 1898 that recounts the history of Prague from prehistory to the 20th century with labels in English and Czech and artifacts such as a scale model of the city as it was between 1826 and 1834 and the Astronomical Clock’s original 1866 calendar wheel; Na Porici 52
  • Museum of Decorative Arts—a museum open since 1900 that has four exhibit halls that feature artifacts such as furniture, tapestries, porcelain, and glasswork; 17 listopadu 2
  • Vysehrad Citadel—a complex of buildings and structures situated on the hilltop of Vysehrad Hill that over the span of 1000 years was a royal residence, religious center, and military fortress; information center at V pevnosti 159/5b
  • Apple Museum—a museum devoted to Apple that claims to have the world’s largest collection of Apple products with everything made by Apple between 1976 and 2012 including computers, laptops, iPods, and iPhones; Husova 21
  • National Museum—a museum built in the 1880s by Josef Schulz as a symbol of the Czech National Revival that inside honors the cultural, intellectual, and scientific history of the Czech Republic; Vaclavske namesti 68
  • National Technical Museum—a family-friendly museum that has halls featuring planes, trains, and cars as well as exhibits on astronomy, photography, printing, and architecture; Kostelni 42
  • Lobkowicz Palace—a 16th-century palace home to the Princely Collections that include paintings, furniture, and musical memorabilia with highlights including paintings by Cranach, Breughel the Elder, Canaletto, and Piranesi and musical scores annotated by Mozart, Beethoven, and Haydn as well as a great collection of musical instruments; Jirska 3
  • Wallenstein Garden—a huge garden that was created for Duke Albrecht of Wallenstein in the 17th century with a loggia decorated with Trojan War scenes and on one side a fake stalactite grotto and bronze statues of Greek gods; Letenska 10
  • Story of Prague Castle—an impressive collection of artifacts that rivals the one at Lobkowicz Palace and depicts 1000 years of Prague Castle’s history from the building of the first wooden palisade to the present with exhibits including the grave of a 9th-century warrior, the helmet and chain possibly worn by St. Wencelas, and replicas of the Bohemian crown jewels
  • Vitus Treasury—a collection of ecclesiastical artifacts founded by Charles IV in the 14th century that includes gold and silver reliquaries encrusted with diamonds, emeralds, and rubies; nadvori II, Prazsky hrad
  • Troja Chateau—a 17th-century Baroque palace that was built for the Sternberk family and has sculptures and frescoes with a permanent exhibition devoted to the interior furniture of the chateau and rotating exhibitions sponsored by the Prague City Gallery; U Trojskeho Zamku 1

Shopping in Brussels

Brussels has markets, beautiful shopping arcades, plenty of chocolate shops, and interesting clothing stores. They seem like they would be worth checking out for sure.

  • Place du Chatelain Market—a food market with cheese, charcuterie, fruits, vegetables, seasonal foods, and more to delight foodies
  • Gabriele—a vintage clothing store that exclusively sells original clothing from the 1920s to the 1980s; Rue des Chartreux 27
  • Pierre Marcolini—a high-end chocolatier and baked goods store with rare chocolate beans, teas, and pralines; Rue des Minimes 1
  • Kure—sells affordable clothing, ceramics, scented candles, and local sweets; Avenue Louise 78
  • Stijl—a top department store with current and classic fashion designers for men and women; Rue Antoine Dansaert 74
  • Mary Chocolatier—a fine chocolate store with beautifully packaged chocolates; 73 Royalstreet
  • Planete Chocolat—an artisanal chocolate factory that sells chocolates made from cocoa butter in unique flavors; Rue du Lombard 24
  • Les Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert—the first covered European shopping arcade that has cafes, theaters, and high-end stores; Galerie du Roi 5
  • Maison Dandoy-Grand Place—a chocolatier who makes fresh biscuits that have rich flavors; Rue au Beurre 31
  • De Biertempel—a beer shop with a great selection of beers; Rue du Marche aux Herbes 56
  • Place du Jeu-de-Balle Flea Market—a crowded flea market with great bargains; Place du Jeu-de-Balle
  • Belge une fois—a concept store that sells creations by a designers’ collective such as accessories, light fixtures, postcards, concrete cacti holders, and large photography prints; Rue Haute 9
  • ICON—an upscale clothing store with clothing by Belgian designers such as Valentine Witmeur Lab, Filles a Papa, and Wehve; Place du Nouveau Marche aux Grains 5
  • Jinzu—a houseware store with handmade Spanish textiles made from recycled cotton including rugs, cushions, and poufs as well as rattan furniture, rocking chairs, and cots; Rue Blaes 122
  • Lulu—a concept store that was once a garage that sells ceramic cacti holders, handmade Italian sunglasses, and Scandinavian furniture; Rue du Page 101
  • Rose—a houseware emporium with everything from pineapple lamps and hand-embroidered pins to leather birthday cards and fragrance sprays; Rue l’Aqueduc 56-58
  • Gare du Midi Market—the largest European market with vendors selling a variety of goods including North African and Mediterranean spices, cheeses, meats, clothing, leather goods, and foods; Gare du Midi
  • Martin Margiela—a designer from Antwerp who sells shoes, accessories, and men’s and women’s clothing; Rue de Flandre 114
  • Crush Wine—a wine cellar selling the most comprehensive selection of Australian wines in Europe with daily tastings, tapas, and wine events; Rue Caroly 39
  • Hoet—a designer eyeglass store with a line of silver filigree glasses; Rue Antoine Dansaert 97
  • Espace Bizarre—a lighting specialist that sells unique lamps and light fixtures; Rue des Charteux 19
  • Passa Porta—a chic bookshop with a small English section; Rue Antoine Dansaert 46
  • Africamali—a community project that sells fair trade and ethical jewelry, accessories, and housewares from sub-Saharan Africa; Chaussee de Wavre 83
  • Brusel—a comic book shop named after a book by Francois Schuiten, one of Belgium’s best-known comic artists, that has a selection of comics with English translations; Boulevard Anspach 100
  • Lowi—a clothing and accessories store that sells unique fashions, ceramics, and porcelain jewelry; Rue de Flandre 124
  • Just in Case—a vintage-inspired clothing store with feminine garments in vintage and colorful shapes; Rue Leon Lepage 63
  • Micro Marche—a handmade craft store that sells affordable and alternative craft products; Quai a la Houille 9
  • Passage du Nord—a vaulted glass arcade with a variety of boutiques; off Rue Neuve
  • Boutique Tintin—a comic shop dedicated to Tintin with albums and merchandise; Rue de la Colline 13
  • Multi-BD—a comic shop with a large selection of comic books including manga as well as figurines and posters; Boulevard Anspach 122-124
  • Sterling Books—an English-language bookstore with comfortable seating areas and a kids’ play area; Rue du Fosse Aux Loups 38
  • Manufacture Belge de Dentelles—a specialty craft store specializing in antique lace; Galerie de la Reine 6-8
  • Outlet Privejoke—an outlet clothing store; Rue Leon Lepage 30
  • City 2—a modern shopping mall with chain stores, electronic gear, great food court, and a post office; Rue Neuve 123

 

Sights in Brussels, Belgium

Brussels like Vienna is another historic city and had the first steam passenger railway in mainland Europe. It is home to great museums, squares, historic structures, and a palace.

  • Grand Place—a medieval square considered one of the most beautiful in Europe with several historic buildings
  • MIM-Musical Instruments Museum—designed in a variety of architectural styles, this museum formerly in the space a department store occupied has 7,000 instruments with 1,500 on display; Rue Montagne de la Cour 2
  • Museum of Natural Sciences—the largest dinosaur gallery in Europe with 30 fossilized Iguanodons and other dinosaurs; Rue Vautier 29
  • Notre Dame du Sablon—a major 14th century Gothic cathedral that highlights the Brabantine Gothic architectural style; Rue de la Regence 3b
  • Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History—located in two historic halls, this museum is home to ten centuries’ worth of military and technological history with suits of armor, antique firearms and swords, and armored vehicles and airplanes along with paintings, sculptures, decorations, and military uniforms; Parc du Cinquantenaire 3
  • Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium—home to a large collection of Flemish School paintings including several by Peter Bruegel; Place Royale 3
  • Atomium—an atom-shaped set of protruding spheres built for the 1958 World’s Fair of Brussels with one sphere that has an exhibit about the history of the building with others devoted to design and architecture exhibits; Avenue de l’Atomium
  • Centre Belge de la Bande Dessinee (Belgian Center for Comic-Strip Art)—the world’s first museum dedicated to comic strips with more than 400 original plates and 25,000 cartoon works and a bookstore that sells graphic novels and comic books in French and Dutch; Rue des Sables 20
  • Mini Europe—a park filled with scale-models of European monuments such as the Eiffel Tower and the bullrings of Granada; Bruparck
  • Musee des Enfants—a children’s museum for ages two to twelve with hands-on educational exhibits and activities such as dressing up in costumes, a hall of mirrors, tunnels, and an oversize camera; Rue de Bourgmestre 15
  • Musee Magritte—opened in 2009, this museum traces Rene Magritte’s life and artwork through letters, sculptures, films, and canvasse; Place Royale 1
  • Oceade—a waterpark with 14 slides, a tropical area, Jacuzzis, geysers, Turkish baths, and an ice bath; Avenue du Football du Championnat 3
  • Cathedrale St-Michel Et Ste-Gudule—the city’s cathedral that pays homage to Saint Michael, the patron saint of Brussels, and Saint Gudule, the daughter of a 7th-century Carolingian noblewoman, whose relics have been preserved at the cathedral for over 1,000 years; inside is a crypt and treasure rooms and painted windows; Parvis Ste-Gudule
  • Hotel de Ville—a 15th-century building that has a belfry topped by a bronze statue of St. Michael crushing the devil and a gateway where statues of the prophets, female figures with lofty virtues, and effigies of dukes and duchesses; inside are Brussels and Mechelen tapestries; Grand’Place
  • Musee Fin-de-Siecle—an art museum dedicated to the innovative period that occurred between 1868 and 1914 when new directions in European art were explored and covers four floors of art from this period; Rue de la Regence 3
  • Musee Horta—the former residence of Victor Horta, one of the major founders of Art Nouveau, who designed the home with this architectural plan and inside are skylights and his studio; Rue Americaine 25
  • Musees du Cinquantenaire—a museum with a wealth of antiquities and treasures from around the world with a great Egyptian and Byzantine section and displays on Belgian archaeology and Brussels tapestries; Parc du Cinquantenaire 10
  • Palais Royal—the official residence of the Belgian royal family that features tapestries, art, and antiques from around the world and a Congo-inspired mirror room; Pl. des Palais
  • Trainworld—a museum that honors the history of Belgium being the first country to establish a steam passenger railway in mainland Europe; this sight is located in the hangars of Belgium’s oldest functioning station and includes 20 full-size locomotives and educational spaces divided according to the history of railroad technology; Pl. Princesse Elisabeth 5

Shopping in Vienna

Vienna has a wealth of shopping experiences from department stores such as Steffl to specialty clothing stores and specialty good stores such as bookstores and stores that sell housewares.

  • Manner Shop—a wafer sweet shop with Austrian candies; Stephansplatz 7
  • Meinl am Graben—a three-level food store for food connoisseurs with ingredients and fine food products; Graben 19
  • Xocolat—a small chocolate shop with a variety of chocolates for sale; Freyung 2
  • Shakespeare and Company—a well-stocked English language bookstore; Sterngasse 2
  • J&L Lobmeyr—a store run by six generations of glass makers who design handmade crystal and chandeliers; Kaertner Strasse 26
  • Das Goldene Wiener Herz—a store that sells porcelain mugs, wine glasses, postcards, and high-quality Viennese t-shirts; Kierchberggasse 17
  • Die Hollerei—a culinary store with a variety of food and beverages to indulge in; Florianigasse 13
  • Uppers and Downers Store—a store that sells vintage fashions, accessories, books, and magazines with unique clothing brands; Burggasse 46
  • La Cure Gourmande—a French and Viennese pastry shop; Neuer Markt 8a
  • Dock 7—sells a selection of Austrian designers, souvenirs, gifts, alcoholic beverages, and eco-friendly clothing and accessories; Kirchengasse 43
  • E. Kochert—a major Viennese jeweler who has designed Austrian royal jewels; Neuer Markt 15
  • Alt-Osterreich—a vintage store with postcards, walking sticks, classic records, and old photographs; Himmelpfortgasse 7
  • Arnold’s—a stylish boutique with international brands and labels such as Happy Socks and Edwin; Siebensterngasse 52
  • Augarten—a porcelain and china store; Spiegelgasse 3
  • Babette’s—a bookshop with a large selection of cookbooks from around the world, a great spice selection, and cooking classes; Schleifmuhlgasse 17
  • Bahnhof City Wien West—a contemporary mall located at the refurbished former Westbahnof train station with over 100 stores including clothing, electronics, and sporting goods; Mariahilferstrasse
  • Be a Good Girl—a boutique with books, accessories, and clothes by brands such as Barbara I Gongini, Don’t Shoot the Messengers, Irina Rohpeter, and Pleasure Principle; Westbahnstrasse 5A
  • Berger—a family-owned business that sells made-to-order ceramics; Weihburggasse 17
  • Bucherer—a jeweler with a large selection of watches as well as gold and diamond jewelry; Karntnerstrasse 2
  • Collins Hute—an accessories shop with scarves, gloves, and hats; Opernpassage
  • Dorotheum—an auction house with a long history that has furnishings from Austrian aristocrats, mirrors, silk fans, and other antique items; Dorotheergasse 17
  • Ebenberg—an eco-apparel store with clothing made from sustainable materials and fashionable silk clothing; Neubaugasse 4
  • EMI—a music store with a large selection of classical music albums as well as a variety of other genres; Karntnerstrasse 30
  • Flo Vintage—a vintage apparel store with styles from 1880-1980 including Charleston dresses, kimonos, bags, shoes, and jewelry; Schleifmuhlgasse 15A
  • Freytag and Berndt—a bookstore with a good selection of maps and travel books; Wallnerstrasse 3
  • Frick—a bookstore with a decent selection of art history books and guidebooks as well as bargain-priced books; Karntnerstrasse 31
  • Gabarage—a store that sells household items designed from recycled materials; Schleifmuhlgasse 6
  • Giesswein—an Austrian clothing store with traditional Austrian children’s and women’s apparel; Karntnerstrasse 5-7
  • Grandits—a stylish men’s store with designer clothing from Armani, Hugo Boss, Ralph Lauren, Versace, and Zegna; Rotenturmstrasse 10
  • Grune Erde (Green Earth)—a shop that sells organic housewares such as eco-friendly furniture, tableware, and cosmetics; Mariahilferstrasse 11
  • Ina Kent—a handbag store with fine exclusive handbags; Neubaugasse 34
  • Kaas Am Markt—a market and eatery with local cheeses, meats, breads, produce, and handmade specialties; Karmelitermarkt 33-36
  • Kulcsar Antiques—an antique store that specializes in silverware, watercolors, and objets d’art; Spiegelgasse 19
  • Lena Hoschek—a designer who uses floral fabrics to create petticoat dresses, blouses, and outfits that have been worn by celebrities like Katy Perry; Gutenberggasse 17
  • Loden-Plankl—a well-established traditional Austrian clothing store for men, women, and children; Michaelerplatz 6
  • Mondrean—a concept fashion store with brands such as Dekker, Rare, Vic Beckham, and Exoal, sunglasses, handbags, perfume, and jewelry; Dorotheergasse 13
  • Morawa—a well-stocked bookstore with books on a variety of subjects, magazines, and newspapers; Wollzeile 11
  • Muhlbauer Headwear—a milliner with unique hats and headwear that have been worn by celebrities like Brad Pitt and Meryl Streep; Seilergasse 10
  • Nachbarin—an avant-garde clothing store with labels such as Veronique Leroy, Anita Moser, and Elena Ghisellini; Gumpendorferstrasse 17
  • Nfive—a minimalist clothing store with labels such as American Vintage, Velvet, Best Behavior, and Tigers of Sweden; Neubaugasse 5
  • Peek and Cloppenberg—a six-story clothing store with well-known labels and off-the-rack bargains; Karntnerstrasse 29
  • Petit Point Kovalcec—a family-run store that sells gift items such as pill boxes, brooches, and needlepoint handbags; Kartnerstrasse 16
  • Pomellato Boutique—a fine jewelry store that has a collection of precious stone and silver jewelry; Tuchlaunbenhof 7A
  • Pregenzer—a designer clothing store with fashionable clothing, shoes, and gadgets; Schleifmuhlgasse 4
  • Printa—a women’s clothing and accessories store with handbags, accessories, clothing, and home décor; Lindengasse 22
  • Reingold—a fine jewelry store known for its designs and specialties in diamond, pearl, refined silver, and gold; Kartnerstrasse 16
  • Schella Kann—the flagship store of this Austrian designer who designs stylish clothing; Spiegelgasse 15
  • Shu!—a shoe store with all types of footwear in all shapes and sizes; Neubaugasse 34
  • Sisi—a boutique with nostalgic styles worn during the time of Empress Elisabeth with some of Austria’s best designers showcased; Annagasse 11
  • Song—a fashion haven with a stylish interior and glamourous labels such as Balenciaga and Margiela and clothing from younger designers as well; Praterstrasse 11-13
  • Spielzeugschachtel—a great toy store with educational and other types of games including wooden games; Rauhensteingasse 5
  • Steffl—a prominent Viennese department store with a variety of goods that are moderately priced; Kartnerstrasse 19
  • Ulliko—a women’s designer who creates clothing in a 1960s style; Kirchengasse 7
  • Wabisabi—a local designer’s shop that has flattering and comfortable clothing; Lindengasse 20
  • Werkbank—a trendy store with knickknacks, skateboards, wall art, and other specialty items; Breitegasse 1

Venturing into Europe…stop 1: Vienna!

The next stop on this tour of the world is the wonderfully diverse Europe. The first place we’ll be exploring is Vienna, the capital of Austria and a very historic and interesting city. There is a wealth of museums, gardens, parks, and tourist attractions to check out in this city. Here is a good handful of the attractions worth checking out.

  • Schonbrunn Palace—a cultural world heritage site and Austria’s most frequently visited tourist attraction with state and residential rooms with traditional furniture and decorations along with a park and gardens surrounding the palace; Schlosstrasse 47
  • Kunsthistorisches Museum—an art museum with works from five millennia from Ancient Egypt to the present day including the world’s largest collection of Bruegel paintings; Maria-Theresien-Platz
  • Zoo Vienna—the oldest existing zoo in the world founded in 1752 and featuring more than 700 species of animals including giant pandas, tigers, orangutans, koalas, and elephants; Vienna 1130
  • Natural History Museum—a natural history museum that includes a large collection of dinosaur skeletons, meteorites, and insects from around the world; Burgring 7
  • Technisches Museum—a museum that depicts Austria’s contributions to the birth of modern technology with multimedia shows and exhibits illustrating our dependence on technology in our daily lives; Mariahilfer Strasse 212
  • Heeresgeschichtliches Museum—a military history museum situated in the center of the Arsenal depicting 500 years of Austrian and European history including the history of the Hapsburg Empire from the 16th century until 1918; Ghegastrasse
  • Austrian Museum of Applied Arts and Contemporary Art—founded in 1863 as the Royal Austrian Museum of Art and Industry, this museum is considered an important art museum featuring art from around the world and from various fields of art; Stubenring 5
  • Imperial Treasury—an elegant building home to 1,000 years of treasures including the Holy Lance, the Imperial Crown, the sable of Charlemagne, and the Burgundian treasures; Scheweizer Hof
  • 21er Haus—Vienna’s newest museum of modern art housed in a building that was built for the 1958 World Expo that was renovated and reopened in 2011 to highlight Austria’s best modern art including the largest collection and archive of Austrian sculptor Fritz Wotruba; Arsenalstrasse 1
  • Belvedere Palace—a magnificent example of Baroque architecture that was originally the summer palace of Prince Eugene of Savoy and later the home of Archduke Franz Ferdinand with 17th century salons, frescoes, and museums dedicated to Austrian painting with the primary attraction a collection of 19th and 20th century Austrian paintings by early 20th century artists such as Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Oskar Kokoschka; Prinz-Eugen Strasse 27
  • Freud Haus—Sigmund Freud’s residence from 1891 to 1938 with five rooms of memorabilia including documents, photographs, telegrams, and waiting-room furniture; Berggasse 19
  • Haus der Muzik (House of Music)—a high-tech music museum located on several floors of an early 19th century palace that features rooms dedicated to great Viennese composers such as Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, and Strauss among others as well as exhibits that trace the development of sound and illustrate how the ear works and interactive computer games including one that allows you to conduct the Vienna Philharmonic; Seilerstatte 30
  • Albertina Museum—an art museum home to almost 65,000 paintings and almost a million prints include works by Leonardo Da Vinci, Durer, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Rembrandt; Augustinerstrasse 1
  • Architekturzentrum Wien (Vienna Architecture Center)—an architectural exhibition with exhibits on Austrian architecture in the 20th and 21st centuries; MuseumsQuartier, Museumsplatz 1
  • Burggarten—a garden oasis with a statue of Franz Josef and a statue of Mozart as well as a butterfly house with tropical trees, waterfalls, a butterfly nursery, and over 150 species on display; Opernring
  • Collection of Arms and Armor—one of the most extensive arms and armor collections in the world with a triumphal arch entrance; Neue Burg, Heldenplatz
  • Collection of Historical Musical Instruments—a collection of musical instruments such as pianos once owned by Brahms, Schumann, and Mahler; Neue Berg, Heldenplatz
  • Ephesus Museum—a museum in the Neue Berg with Roman antiquities discovered by Austrian archaeologists; Neue Berg, Heldenplatz
  • Falschermuseum (Museum of Art Fakes)—a unique museum with forged pieces including Chagall and Rembrandt paintings and a fake diary written by Adolf Hitler; Lowengasse 28
  • Globe Museum—a museum featuring a collection of over 400 terrestrial and celestial globes with the oldest an earth globe from 1536 and a ground floor level exhibit on the history of Esperanto; Herrengasse 9
  • Hofbibliotek (National Library)—a majestic baroque library with a grand hall featuring treasured books and biannual special exhibits in the hall displaying some of the rare books in German and English; Josefsplatz 1
  • Hofmobiliendepot (Furniture Museum)—a museum that displays the furniture of the royal court and re-created rooms that illustrate the history of furniture making in Vienna; Mariahilferstrasse 88
  • Judenplatz Museum—formerly the Jewish ghetto and the remains of a 13th-century synagogue that is dedicated to Austrian Jews who died during World War II; inside are three exhibition rooms that describe medieval Jewish life and excavations of the synagogue; Judenplatz 8
  • Judisches Museum der Stadt Wien—situated within the former Eskeles Palace is the Jewish Museum of Vienna that features permanent exhibits that illustrate the role Viennese Jews played in their professions from philosophy to music as well as a café and bookstore; Dorotheergasse 11
  • Kaiserappartements (Imperial Apartments)—a suite of eighteen rooms that can be reached by climbing up the marble Emperor’s Staircase that includes the rooms where the ruling family of the Hapsburg Empire conducted their affairs such as the room where Emperor Franz Josef in 1889 was told that his only son, Crown Prince Rudolf, had killed himself and his soulmate; Emperor Franz Josef’s simple iron bed; and Empress Elizabeth’s gymnastics equipment as well as five rooms devoted to Elizabeth’s most valued possessions; Hofburg, Schweizer Hof
  • Karlskirche—a church dedicated to St. Charles Borromeo whose exterior columns portray scenes from Borromeo’s life and the rights of the Hapsburgs to their Spanish territories and interior has fine vault frescoes and a panoramic elevator that takes visitors to the sphere of the dome where they can view the heart of Vienna; Karlsplatz
  • Kunsthaus Wien—an art museum with international exhibitions as well as displays of the artwork of Friedensreich Hundertwasser; Untere Weissgerberstrasse 13
  • Leopold Museum—a museum that features the collection of Rudolf and Elizabeth Leopold including one of the world’s best collections of Austrian painter Egon Schiele’s works and works of art by Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoshka, and Richard Gerstl; MuseumsQuartier, Museumsplatz 1
  • Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig (Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation)—Austria’s collection of 20th century art that has eight floors filled with American pop art, Rene Magritte works, Max Ernst, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Cy Twombly; MuseumsQuartier, Museumsplat 1
  • Prater—a public park with amusement park rides such as a restored Ferris wheel, a planetarium, and a museum that elaborates on the Prater’s history; Riesenradplatz
  • Romermuseum—a museum with the ruins of a Roman military camp that dates back to the 2nd and 3rd centuries including fragments of buildings, pieces of pottery, children’s toys, statues, idols, and ornaments as well as interactive games for children; Hoher Markt 3
  • Schonbrunn Schlosspark (Palace Park)—on the grounds of the Schonbrunn Palace is this park with a zoo, carriage museum, panoramic views of the city and palace complex, a playground, and maze; Schonbrunner-Schloss-Strasse
  • Uhrenmuseum (Clock Museum)—a clock museum with three floors of clocks and watches dating from the 15th century to the present; Schulhof 2
  • Volksgarten—a park with a rose garden, a Greek temple, and a monument to Empress Elisabeth, Franz Josef’s wife, who was assassinated by an Italian anarchist in 1898; Burgring 1
  • Wien Museums Karlsplatz—a museum with Viennese historical artifacts such as 16th century armor, paintings by Schiele and Klimt, and the preserved façade of Otto Wagner’s Die Zeit offices; Karlsplatz
  • Zoom Kinder Museum (Zoom Children’s Museum)—a children’s museum with a lab where children can explore virtual reality, make screenplays come alive, and play in the imaginary ocean with underwater creatures; MuseumsQuartier, Museumsplatz 1

 

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