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Shopping in Edmonton

Edmonton is home to the West Edmonton Mall which is the world’s largest shopping and entertainment complex  as well as several other malls. It also has a wealth of antique stores worth checking out.

  • Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market—the largest indoor farmers’ market in Edmonton with over 130 vendors selling freshly prepared local food and handmade crafts; 10310 83rd Avenue NW
  • West Edmonton Mall—the world’s largest shopping and entertainment center with over 800 stores and 20 restaurants as well as the world’s largest indoor amusement park, a tropical rainforest, and indoor bungee jump; 8882 170th Street
  • Old Stratchona Antique Mall—the largest antique mall in western Canada with two floors of vintage and antique pieces including furniture, jewelry, home décor, sports memorabilia, and games; 10323 78th Avenue NW
  • Southgate Centre—a shopping mall with 165 stores including Fossil, Lego, Aritzia, and Apple, and anchored by Hudson’s Bay and Sears; 5015-111 Street
  • Kingsway Mall—a shopping mall with over 200 stores such as Sears, Hudson’s Bay, Forever 21, H&M, The Disney Store, and Sephora; 109 Street and Kingsway Avenue
  • Zocalo—a store that sells flowers, gifts, plants, and home décor and has an espresso bar; 10826 95th Street NW
  • Ibon Antiques—a two-level antique store with vintage and collectible items and Moorcraft art pottery from the United Kingdom; 10423 79th Avenue NW
  • Curiosity Inc.—an antique shop with vintage motorcycles, masks, and toys among other unique items; 10056 164th Street NW

 

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Sights in Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital city of Alberta and is home to interesting museums, parks, and natural attractions.

  • Fort Edmonton Park—a park that has re-creations of Edmonton throughout its history with a stable, general store, wooden sidewalks, a steam train, horses, gravel roads, and rides; On Whitemud Drive
  • Art Gallery of Alberta—a modern art museum that opened in 2010 and has over 6000 pieces of historic and contemporary art veering towards Canadian art; 2 Sir Winston Churchill Square
  • Muttart Conservatory—a botanical garden with four pyramids that have plants from different climates and an onsite café; 9626 96A Street
  • Royal Alberta Museum—a newly renovated museum in the downtown area with a large collection that showcases Alberta’s natural and cultural history with the world’s largest collection of insects, a display about Alberta’s aboriginal culture, and a gallery where the province is divided into sections based on geography with plants and animals native to each area featured in their respective zones; 103A Avenue
  • Alberta Railway Museum—a museum that has over 75 train cars including steam and diesel locomotives; 24215 34th Street
  • Telus World of Science—an interactive science museum that allows visitors to use crime-solving technology to solve crimes, learn about living in space, practice being a paleontologist, and learn more about the human body; 11211 142nd Street
  • Valley Zoo—a zoo with over 100 exotic, endangered, and Canadian native animals as well as a petting zoo, camel and pony rides, a miniature train, carousel, and paddleboats; 13315 Buena Vista Road
  • Alberta Legislature—the former location of Fort Edmonton that is now Alberta’s legislative seat with a majestic dome and marble interior and offers visitors 45-minute tours and an interpretive center that describes the building’s architectural and political history; corner of 97th Avenue and 107th Street
  • Alberta Government House—a mansion that was once the home of the lieutenant governor but is now used for conferences and receptions and is well-preserved with artwork by Canadian artists; 12845 102nd Avenue
  • Galaxy Land—the world’s largest indoor amusement park with over 27 rides; West Edmonton Mall, 170th Street
  • Alberta Aviation Museum—a museum located in the last double-long double-wide hangar from WWII that has educational programs and shares the stories of aviators; 11410 Kingsway NW
  • University of Alberta Botanic Garden—a 240-acre garden with indoor greenhouses, a Japanese garden, a tropical greenhouse with exotic butterflies, a Native Peoples garden, and experimental garden beds; 51227 Highway 60
  • Rutherford House Provincial Historic Site—once the home of the first Premier of Alberta, Alexander Cameron Rutherford, this brick mansion has been restored with period furniture; 11153 Saskatchewan Drive NW
  • John Janzen Nature Centre—a newly renovated nature center with interactive exhibits, programs, events, and an indoor play area; 7000-143 Street, Whitemud Drive and Fox Drive

Sights in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and major city of Nova Scotia and has a maritime history, art galleries, and fun museums for families to enjoy.

  • Anna Leonowens Gallery—founded by Anna Leonowens, the royal governess who inspired The King and I, and the founder of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, this gallery was named in her honor and has three exhibition spaces with an emphasis on modern studio and media art that has 125 exhibitions a year; 1891 Granville Street
  • Art Gallery of Nova Scotia—an art gallery housed in an 1867 building that once served as a post office, bank, and the headquarters of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, that has a permanent collection of over 17,000 works of art by modern Canadian painters, photographers such as Annie Leibowitz, and a renowned collection of maritime folk art; 1723 Hollis Street
  • Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21—Pier 21 once was the entry point into Canada for almost a million immigrants between 1928 and 1971 and is now the focus of a national museum that honors the contributions these immigrants made to Canada’s culture and economy; 1055 Marginal Road
  • Discovery Centre—an interactive science center with hands-on exhibits that explore physics, engineering, architecture, viscosity, and other subjects; 1593 Barrington Street
  • Halifax Citadel National Historic Site—this citadel built between 1826 and 1856 on the highest hill in Halifax is Canada’s most visited National Historic Site; there is a multimedia presentation on small forts and gun emplacements on the harbor islands and the bluffs above the harbor; tours of the barracks, guardroom, and powder magazine; and costumed reenactors practicing drills; Citadel Hill, 5425 Sackville Street
  • Halifax Public Gardens—among the oldest formal Victorian gardens in North America, this garden was completed in 1875 by the former gardener to the Duke of Devonshire and has gravel paths that wind around ponds, trees, and flower beds with a variety of plants from around the world as well as a café in the gardens; bounded by Sackville, Summer, and South Park Streets and Spring Garden Road
  • Halifax Seaport Farmers’ Market—a waterfront market that features the wares of artisans, over 200 local farmers, and cooks in a sustainable building with wind turbines, solar-energy and water-conservation systems, and a bio-wall providing for natural ventilation; 1209 Marginal Road
  • Historic Properties—a collection of restored waterfront warehouses that have been converted into shops, offices, restaurants, and pubs but seven have been designated as National Historic Sites; 1869 Upper Water Street
  • Maritime Museum of the Atlantic—a waterfront museum with displays that commemorate Nova Scotia’s sailing legacy particularly the Titanic and the Halifax explosion with 20 or so artifacts from the wreck of the Titanic including the ship’s only surviving deck chair, wall paneling, a balustrade molding, and the wireless operator’s log from the day the ship sank; other exhibits focus on the Canadian Navy, sailing ships, small craft boats, and steam-powered ships; 1675 Lower Water Street
  • Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History—a museum that allows visitors to learn about the plants and animals in Nova Scotia and has a nature center that is home to snakes, frogs, insects, and other animals; 1747 Summer Street
  • Point Pleasant Park—a former fortification site converted into a public park with 186 acres of walking paths and seafront paths as well as a massive round tower military installation and great views of ships entering the harbor; 5718 Point Pleasant Drive

Shopping in Vancouver

Vancouver is a great shopping destination with shops that appeal to all tastes and a good mix of upscale and bargain stores. There are also many Canadian Native galleries and shops.

  • Aberdeen Centre—a luxurious mall home to great Asian restaurants, vendors that sell kimchi and cream puffs among other foods, clothing stores with styles from Hong Kong, and a Japanese bargain clothing store; 4151 Hazelbridge Way, Richmond
  • Ayoub’s Dried Fruits and Nuts—a shop that sells freshly roasted almonds, pistachios, and cashews and has a signature lime-saffron seasoning; 986 Denman Street
  • Barbara-Jo’s Books to Cooks—run by a local chef turned business owner, this bookstore sells tons of cookbooks with many by chefs from Vancouver and British Columbia as well as wine books, memoirs, and magazines; 1740 W. Second Avenue
  • Barefoot Contessa—a clothing store with 1940s-style clothing such as frilly dresses, jewelry, and bags as well as décor and vintage linens; 3715 Main Street
  • Boboli—a spacious department store with a large shoe department and Italian designer clothing for men and women; 2776 Granville Street
  • Chocolate Arts—a chocolatier who designs chocolates in First Nations themes and also sells hot chocolate, bonbons, and house-made ice cream; 1620 W. Third Avenue
  • Crafthouse—this store run by the Craft Council of British Columbia sells works by local artisans, jewelry, gift items, and investment pieces; 1386 Cartwright Street
  • Dayton Boot Company—a popular boot store that has sold handmade leather biker boots since 1948; 2250 East Hastings Street
  • Doda Antiques—an antiques shop with mid-20th century jewelry, ceramics, glass, paintings, and prints as well as First Nations art; 434 Richards Street
  • Downtown Farmers’ Market—an outdoor market that sells baked goods, artisanal food, crafts, and locally made beer, wine, and spirits; 650 Hamilton Street
  • Dream Apparel and Articles for People—a clothing store with locally designed clothing targeted to those in their 20s; Net Loft, 130-1666 Johnston Street
  • Edible Canada—a small food store that sells jams, sauces, chocolates, and other edible items; 1596 Johnston Street
  • Fine Finds Boutique—a women’s clothing store with jewelry and accessories as well; 1014 Mainland Street
  • Front and Company—a consignment and vintage clothing store with designer sample items, gift items, and new items; 3772 Main Street
  • Gallery of BC Ceramics—an art gallery with decorative ceramic designed by local artists for sale; 1359 Cartwright Street
  • Ganache Patisserie—a food store with treats such as cakes and baked goods; 1262 Homer Street
  • Granville Island Public Market—an indoor marketplace with stalls that sell locally made sausages; exotic cheeses; freshly caught fish; fresh produce; baked goods; and prepared goods; 1689 Johnston Street
  • Gravity Pope—a shoe store with designer labels such as Camper, Trippen, and Common Projects; 2205 W. 4th Avenue
  • Hill’s Native Art—an art store with Vancouver’s best selection of First Nations art, souvenirs, keepsakes, carvings, masks, and drums; 165 Water Street
  • Inuit Gallery of Vancouver—an art gallery and craft store with Inuit carvings in soapstone and antler as well as baskets, totems, bentwood boxes, and masks; 206 Cambie Street
  • John Fluevog—a Vancouver destination for unique shoes that also has shops in New York and Los Angeles; 65 Water Street
  • Kalena’s—a family-run shoe store since the 1960s with leather sandals, pumps, and quality Italian shoes; 1526 Commercial Drive
  • Kidsbooks—a children’s book store with books for all ages from toddlers to teens with many from Canadian authors; 2557 West Broadway
  • Kit and Ace—a clothing store born in Vancouver and now an international chain with silk and cashmere clothing; 151 Water Street
  • Kitsilano Farmers’ Market—a farmers’ market held every Sunday from mid-May to mid-October in the parking lot of the Kitsilano Community Centre with cheese, chocolates, wine, coffee, baked goods, and food trucks; 2690 Larch Street
  • Lattimer Gallery—a shop that looks like a Pacific Northwest Indian longhouse and sells native arts and crafts such as masks, jewelry, bentwood boxes, and carvings; 1590 W. 2nd Avenue
  • Leone—a high-end designer clothing store with labels such as Versace, Alexander McQueen, Moschino, Dior, and others for men and women; Sinclair Centre, 757 W. Hastings Street
  • Les Amis du Fromage—a family-run shop that sells a variety of cheeses and delicacies; 1752 West Second Avenue
  • MacLeod’s Books—a bookstore with used and older published works; 455 W. Pender Street
  • McArthurglen Designer Outlet—an outlet mall with stores such as J. Crew, Nike, and Levi’s and designer brands like Hugo Boss, Armani, and Polo Ralph Lauren; 7899 Templeton Station Road, Richmond
  • MEC (Mountain Equipment Co-Op)—an outdoor lovers’ destination since the 1970s that sells performance clothing and equipment for hiking, cycling, climbing, and kayaking; 130 W. Broadway
  • Mintage—a 3,000-square-foot vintage shop with wedding dresses, cowboy boots, hats, jewelry, menswear, and party attire as well as recycled designs from vintage fabrics; 1714 Commercial Drive
  • Museum of Anthropology Shop—the anthropology museum’s gift shop with Northwest Coast jewelry, carvings, prints, and books on First Nations history and culture; University of British Columbia, 6393 Northwest Marine Drive
  • Oak + Fort—a clothing chain based in Vancouver with stylish and locally designed women’s clothing and accessories as well as menswear and home décor; 355 Water Street
  • Oakridge Centre—a shopping mall with stylish shops, high-end boutiques, and North American chains; 650 West 41st Avenue at Cambie Street
  • One of a Few—a clothing and accessories store with designs from local and international designers; 354 Water Street
  • Pacific Centre—a three-city-block long downtown shopping mall with mainstream clothing stores such as Holt Renfrew, Nordstrom, and Hudson’s Bay and pricy boutiques; 701 West Georgia Street
  • Palladio—a stylish jeweler with fashionable gold and platinum pieces, watches, and accessories; 855 West Hastings Street
  • Purdy’s Chocolates—a chocolatier since 1907 that makes a variety of chocolate treats; Pacific Centre, 700 West Georgia Street
  • Roots—an outdoor destination with Canadian sweatshirts, leather jackets, and casual attire for men, women, and children; 1001 Robson Street
  • Secret Location—a gallery with clothing, accessories, jewelry, and art books; 1 Water Street
  • Shop Cocoon—an independent designer clothing store with accessories and jewelry as well; 3345 Cambie Street
  • Swirl—a Canadian wine shop with over 650 varieties of wine and free tastings on weekend afternoons; 1185 Mainland Street
  • T&T Supermarket—an Asian supermarket chain with produce, baked goods, and prepared foods as well as a large hot food counter; 179 Keefer Place
  • Three Vets—an army surplus store with affordable camping gear, outdoor clothing, and boots and a backroom collection of First Nations artwork; 2200 Yukon Street
  • Turnabout—a high-quality vintage clothing store with women’s clothing from labels such as Gucci, Missoni, and Prada; 3135 Granville Street
  • Twigg and Hottie—a sustainable clothing store with apparel from local and national designers; 3671 Main Street
  • Urban Fare—a stylish supermarket chain with food displays showcasing food from around the world and an eat-in deli; 1133 Alberni Street
  • Vancouver Special—a housewares store with household items by local and international designers and a selection of books about architecture, art, and design; 3612 Main Street
  • Walrus Design—a gift shop with jewelry, crafts, unique T-shirts, and original artwork; 3408 Cambie Street
  • Winners—a discount department store with designer clothing, shoes, and housewares; 798 Granville Street at Robson Street

 

Sights in Vancouver

Vancouver is the major city of British Columbia and is home to botanical gardens, world-class museums, an aquarium, and several parks and beaches. It certainly appears to be a place worth checking out.

  • Ambleside Park and Beach—West Vancouver’s most popular beach with tennis courts, volleyball nets, and a water park in the summer as well as a large off-leash area for dogs; Argyle Avenue at 13th Street
  • BC Sports Hall of Fame and Museum—a museum inside the BC Place Stadium complex that honors British Columbia’s top athletes through historical displays and galleries that commemorate the 2010 Winter Olympics and another honoring aboriginal artists; other galleries allow you to test your sprinting, climbing, and throwing abilities in a participation gallery and the Terry Fox Memorial pays tribute to a student who ran across Canada after losing his leg to cancer and raised millions of dollars for cancer research; BC Place, 777 Pacific Boulevard, South Gate A, at Beatty and Robson streets
  • Beaty Biodiversity Museum—a museum on the campus of the University of British Columbia that showcases over 2 million specimens from the university’s collections including an 82-foot-long blue whale skeleton (the largest in Canada), bones, fossils, preserved lizards, animal skulls, stuffed birds, and other animal specimens as well as a Discovery Lab for children to examine animal refuse under a microscope and compare claws of different birds; 2212 Main Mall
  • Bill Reid Gallery—a small Aboriginal art gallery that showcases Bill Reid’s works and the works of contemporary aboriginal artists including wood carvings, jewelry, and sculptures; 639 Hornby Street
  • Canada Place—a four city-block long complex designed with Teflon-coated fiberglass that is home to Vancouver’s cruise-ship terminal and a simulated flight attraction that takes passengers on a trip around the country, the Canadian Trail that has displays about each province and territory, and the Port of Vancouver Discovery Centre which has a history wall with artifacts, images, and interactive displays; 999 Canada Place Way
  • Capilano River Regional Park—a park with 16 miles of hiking trails and footbridges over the Capilano River, the Capilano Salmon Hatchery where salmon can be viewed and visitors can learn about the life cycle of salmon, and the Cleveland Dam which dams the Capilano River to create the 3.5-mile-long Capilano Reservoir; Capilano Road
  • Capilano Suspension Bridge—Vancouver’s oldest attraction was built in 1889 and allows visitors to see rainforest scenery and walk across the 450-foot cedar plank suspension bridge hanging 230 feet above the Capilano River to the Treetops Adventure which lets you walk along 650 feet of cable bridges hung among the trees; besides crossing the bridge there are also viewing decks, nature trails, a totem park, and a carving center as well as history and forestry exhibits, a large gift shop in the original 1911 teahouse, and a restaurant; 3735 Capilano Road
  • Chinese Cultural Centre Museum and Archives—a museum that illustrates the roles Chinese Canadians played in World War I and II and has an upstairs art gallery with traveling exhibits by Chinese and Canadian artists; across the street is the Chinatown Memorial Monument that memorializes the Chinese-Canadian community’s contribution to British Columbia, Canada, and Vancouver; 555 Columbia Street
  • Christ Church Cathedral—the oldest church in Vancouver that was built between 1889 and 1895 and built in a Gothic style with a sandstone and Douglas fir exterior and has 32 stained-glass windows depicting Old and New Testament scenes; 690 Burrard Street
  • Sun Yat-Sen Chinese Garden—the first Ming Dynasty-style garden outside China that was built in 1986 by 52 Chinese artisans from Suzhou and used design elements and materials from private gardens in Suzhou and guided tours are available during the summer and off-season during specified times; 578 Carrall Street
  • Equinox Gallery—housed in a former tractor company building, this is a 14,000-square-foot gallery that features artwork by modern Canadian and international artists; 525 Great Northern Way
  • Granville Island Public Market—a 50,000-square-foot building that sells locally grown fruits and vegetables; crafts; chocolates; artisanal cheeses and pastas; fish; meat; flowers; and exotic foods; 1689 Johnston Street
  • Granville Island Water Park—North America’s largest free public water park that has slides, pipes, and sprinklers and a grass patch for picnicking; 1318 Cartwright Street
  • R. Macmillan Space Centre—a space-themed museum with interactive exhibits, a flight simulator, an exhibit about Canada’s accomplishments in space, and a hands-on area with exhibits that feature a moon rock and a computer program that enables visitors to see what they would look like as an alien; Vanier Park, 1100 Chestnut Street
  • Kids Market—a child-friendly warehouse market with an indoor play area and two floors of shops that sell toys and books; 1496 Cartwright Street
  • Library Square—a library building in the shape of a spiral that has open plazas and a high atrium that includes a high-tech library, cafes, and fast food restaurants; 350 West Georgia Street
  • Lynn Canyon Park—a 616-acre park with a canyon landscape, a rain forest with waterfalls, and a suspension bridge that is 166 ½ feet above Lynn Creek as well as hiking trails, an ecology center that has maps of hiking trails, waterfalls, and pools, a gift shop, and a café; 3663 Park Road
  • Museum of Anthropology—this museum part of the University of British Columbia has one of the world’s top collections of Northwest Coast First Nations art including canoes, bentwood boxes, tools, textiles, masks, and artifacts from around the world as well as a ceramics gallery with 600 pieces from 15th to 19th century Europe; University of British Columbia, 6393 Northwest Marine Drive
  • Museum of Vancouver—a small seaside museum with a gallery that depicts Japanese internment during World War II and the local war effort, a 1950s gallery with a 1955 Ford Fairlane Victoria and a Seeburg jukebox, and a 1960s-themed revolution gallery that highlights Vancouver’s countercultural past; Vanier Park, 1100 Chestnut Street
  • Nitobe Memorial Garden—opened in 1960 in memory of Japanese scholar and diplomat Dr. Inazo Nitobe, this is a 2.5-acre walled garden with a pond, a stream with a small waterfall, and a teahouse and is considered to be one of the most authentic Japanese tea and walking gardens outside of Japan; University of British Columbia, 1895 Lower Mall
  • Old Hastings Mill Store Museum—the only remaining building from the 1886 fire in Vancouver and has existed since 1865 making it Vancouver’s first store and oldest building with displays of First Nations artifacts and pioneer era household products; 1575 Alma Street
  • Queen Elizabeth Park—a 130-acre park that has spacious sunken gardens; a rose garden; picnic areas; 18 tennis courts; an 18-hole putting green; and a restaurant; Cambie Street at 33rd Avenue
  • Roedde House Museum—an 1893 historic home set amid Victorian-era gardens with a restored interior that has antique furniture; 1415 Barclay Street
  • Science World—an interactive science museum with exhibits and demonstrations on the natural world, biology, anatomy, and other topics and next door is an outdoor science park which focuses on environmental issues; 1455 Quebec Street
  • Stanley Park Beaches—two beaches accessible from Stanley Park with a playground, heated pool with slides, and long stretches of sand; 7495 Stanley Park Drive
  • Stanley Park Miniature Train—a child-size steam train that takes children and adults through the woods of Stanley Park; off Pipeline Road
  • Stanley Park Nature House—Vancouver’s ecology center that has information, special programs, and guided tours; Stanley Park, Alberni Street
  • Stanley Park Seawall—a seawall path that includes a 5.5-mile shoreline section extending past marinas, cafes, and condos to downtown Canada Place
  • University of British Columbia Botanical Garden—a 70-acre botanical garden with 10,000 trees, shrubs, and rare plants from around the world including an Asian garden; a medicinal plants garden; an alpine garden with rare plants; and 1,010-foot-long Greenheart Canopy Walkway which is a network of suspension bridges between cedar and hemlock trees that takes visitors to eight platforms in the trees and a two-story viewing platform; 6804 Southwest Marine Drive
  • Vancouver Aquarium—a research and educational site home to sea otters, dolphins, sea lions, and harbor seals; an Amazon Gallery with a rainforest jungle with piranhas, caimans, and tropical birds; the Tropic Zone with clownfish, moray eels, and black-tip reef sharks; and hands-on displays; 845 Avison Way
  • Vancouver Art Gallery—western Canada’s largest art gallery featuring Canadian painter Emily Carr’s wilderness paintings and rotating historical and modern exhibitions; 750 Hornby Street
  • Vancouver Lookout Tower—a 553-foot-high observation deck with great views of Vancouver, a glass elevator, and a top-floor restaurant; 555 West Hastings Street
  • Vancouver Maritime Museum—a museum home to the RCMP Arctic St. Roch, the first ship to sail in both directions through the Northwest Passage and the first to circumnavigate North America; a maritime discovery center with hands-on activities and interactive touch displays; a large collection of model ships; and the Ben Franklin submersible that was built in 1968 as a marine research tool; Vanier Park, 1905 Ogden Avenue
  • Vandusen Botanical Garden—a 55-acre botanical garden with an Elizabethan maze, a formal rose garden, a meditation garden, and a collection of Canadian plants as well as a garden with hybrid water lilies and carnivorous plants, five lakes, a garden shop, a library, and a café; 5251 Oak Street

Shopping in Victoria

Victoria has small shopping areas and is home to specialty districts such as Antique Row and Chinatown. Some shops have been around since the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

  • Antique Row—a former antiques district that is now home to outlets that sell artisanal food and environmentally sustainable clothing
  • Artina’s—a jewelry shop with Canadian-made jewelry; 1002 Government Street
  • Bay Centre—a downtown shopping mall with 100 boutiques and restaurants; 1150 Douglas Street
  • Chinatown—a Chinese shopping area with imported Chinese goods, fruits and vegetables, children’s toys, wicker fans, and fabric slippers
  • Cook Culture—an upscale kitchenware store in the Atrium Building that also serves as a cooking school that offers workshops on topics such as handling knives and making sushi; 1317 Blanshard Street
  • Cowichan Trading—a well-known store with First Nations jewelry, art, moccasins, and Cowichan sweaters; 1328 Government Street
  • Hill’s Native Art—a First Nations store with souvenirs, totems, masks, jewelry, and Inuit sculptures; 1008 Government Street
  • Idar—a small jewelry store that is home to the workshop of one of the few goldsmiths in America that forges gold by hand and sells gold, silver, and platinum pieces; 946 Fort Street
  • Irish Linen Stores—a small clothing store open since 1917 that sells linen, lace, and hand-embroidered items; 1019 Government Street
  • Lower Johnson Street—a row of Victorian storefronts with designer clothing stores, boutiques, and eco-friendly clothing stores; Johnson Street between Government and Store streets
  • Munro’s Books—a former bank restored into a well-stocked independent bookstore with bargain books in a remainders bin; 1108 Government Street
  • Murchie’s—a company in existence since 1894 that is the city’s oldest tea shop with over 90 varieties of tea and coffees, tarts, and cakes; 1110 Government Street
  • Rogers’ Chocolates—a chocolatier since 1885 that sells a specialty called Victoria creams in 19 different flavors; 913 Government Street
  • Silk Road—a tea shop with over 300 varieties of tea and a tasting bar as well as aromatherapy remedies and spa treatments; 1624 Government Street
  • Trounce Alley—a pedestrian mall with art galleries and upscale clothing stores; north of View Street and between Broad and Government streets

Sights in Victoria

Victoria is the capital of British Columbia and is home to many natural attractions such as Butchart Gardens and Abkhazi Garden and Teahouse as well as interesting museums and historic sites.

  • Abkhazi Garden and Teahouse—a beautiful one-acre garden that was formerly a private garden and is known for its design that has plants such as Garry Oak trees, Japanese maples, and rhododendrons; 1964 Fairfield Road
  • Art Gallery of Greater Victoria—attached to an 1889 mansion, this art gallery is home to one of Canada’s largest collections of Asian art with a Japanese garden in between that features the only real Shinto shrine in North America; 1044 Moss Street
  • Beacon Hill Park—a 154-acre park that connects the downtown area to the waterfront with sprawling lawns that provide views of the Pacific Ocean, Olympic Mountains, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and ponds, walking paths, flowers and gardens, a cricket pitch, and a petting zoo; Bordered by Douglas Street, Southgate Street, and Cook Street
  • Butchart Gardens—a 55-acre garden and National Historic site that has been frequented since 1904 and has the 70-foot Ross Fountain, a formal Japanese garden, an Italian garden with a gelato stand, an old-fashioned carousel, a plant identification center, seed and gift shop, two restaurants, and a coffee shop; 800 Benvenuto Avenue
  • Craigdarroch Castle—a turreted mansion with Gothic rooflines that was the home of one of British Columbia’s richest men, Robert Dunsmuir, who died a few months before the castle was completed in 1889, and is now a museum that depicts life in the late 19th century with 39 rooms that have Victorian furniture, stained glass windows, carved woodwork, and a painted ceiling in the drawing room; 1050 Joan Crescent
  • Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Sites of Canada—the world’s best preserved coastal artillery fort dating back to 1895 and Canada’s oldest West Coast lighthouse that includes a lighthouse keeper’s house, guardhouses, and a fortress plotting room; 603 Fort Rodd Hill Road
  • Goldstream Provincial Park—a 1,180-acre wilderness park located 10 miles north of downtown Victoria with eagles, bears, and three salmon species as well as picnic areas, walking paths, and a skills-development trail for mountain bikers; Hwy. 1 at Finlayson Arm Road, Langford, Victoria
  • Government House Gardens—the residence of British Columbia’s lieutenant governor, Queen Elizabeth II’s representative in British Columbia, which has 35 acres of formal gardens and the 19th century Cary Castle Mews which includes an interpretive center, costume museum, and tearoom; 1401 Rockland Avenue
  • Hatley Park National Historic Site—a 40-room ivy-covered manor conceived by James Dunsmuir, a former premier of British Columbia and the son of Robert Dunsmuir from Craigdarroch Castle, that was built in only 18 months and is now part of Royal Roads University so only guided tours are allowed; there are also Italian, Japanese, and English rose gardens; 2005 Sooke Road, Colwood, Victoria
  • Legacy Art Gallery Downtown—a downtown art gallery with rotating exhibits from the University of Victoria’s art collection and Canadian art shows; 630 Yates Street
  • Maritime Museum of British Columbia—situated in Victoria’s original courthouse, this museum has two floors of model ships, weaponry, ships’ wheels, and photographs as well as handmade boats like the Tilikum that sailed from Victoria to England between 1901 and 1904; 28 Bastion Square
  • Market Square—a pedestrian square with cafes and boutiques that sell gifts, jewelry, and local art and feature open-air art shows, flea markets, and street entertainers in the summer; 560 Johnson Street
  • Miniature World—an attraction with over 85 miniature dioramas including space, castle and fairy tale scenes and one of the world’s largest model railways as well as dollhouses and animated models; Fairmont Empress Hotel, 649 Humboldt Street
  • Mount Douglas Regional Park—a park with a path and a road that lead to the 758-foot summit of Mount Douglas giving you a view of Victoria and the Saanich Peninsula as well as the Gulf and San Juan Islands; there is also a long beach, evergreen forests, hiking trails, and wildflower meadows; Off Cedar Hill Road
  • Parliament Buildings—designed by 25-year-old Francis Rattenbury who also designed the Fairmont Empress Hotel and completed in 1897, the stone buildings have a central dome with a gilded statue of Captain George Vancouver, the first European to sail around Vancouver Island, and a statue in the front of Queen Victoria; inside are stained-glass windows, moldings, and historic photographs as well as a public gallery for when the legislature is in session; 501 Belleville Street
  • Royal British Columbia Museum—one of the top sights in Victoria, this museum depicts several thousand years of British Columbian history with a First Peoples Gallery that has a real native house, an exhibit on First Nations languages, and a collection of masks and other artifacts; a Natural History Gallery that shows the landscapes of British Columbia from prehistory to the present and has an “Ocean Station” exhibit that allows children to run a submarine; a History Gallery with a replica of Captain Vancouver’s HMS Discovery and a re-created frontier town; and an IMAX theater; 675 Belleville Street
  • Shaw Centre from the Salish Sea—a marine interpretive center where you are able to go on a simulated ride underwater in a deep-sea elevator and see jellyfish, starfish, wolf eels, rockfish, and octopi as well as children’s activities and touch tanks; 9811 Seaport Place, Sydney, Victoria
  • The Robert Bateman Centre—opened in 2013, this small art gallery has over 100 works from etchings to paintings that span 70 years of Canada’s most well-known wildlife artist with one gallery featuring paintings matched to bird songs; 470 Belleville Street
  • Victoria Bug Zoo—this small zoo is home to the largest collection in North America of live tropical insects including walking sticks, scorpions, millipedes, and a pharnacia (the world’s longest insect at 22 inches); 631 Courtney Street
  • Victoria Butterfly Gardens—an indoor garden with thousands of butterflies including 70 different species and also is home to orchids and carnivorous plants, tropical fish, flamingoes, tortoises, geckos, poison dart frogs, and 30 types of free-flying tropical birds; 1461 Benvenuto Avenue

Shopping in Montreal

Montreal is definitely a shopping destination and has high-end boutiques and designer flagships as well as several well-known department stores and malls.

  • Abe and Mary’s—a high-end clothing store with designer clothing by Elizabeth and James and Yosi Samra as well as vintage couture and an upstairs sample sale section with affordable jewelry, clothing, and shoes and a café; 4175 rue Jean-Talon Ouest
  • Aime Com Moi—a stylish designer clothing store that promotes young Quebecois designers and is geared towards women over 30 with styles such as skirts and recycled creations; 150 av. Mont-Royal Est
  • Antiquites Curiosites—an antique store with furniture and accessories from the 1930s to the 1980s and 1960s-era teak pieces; 1769 rue Amherst
  • Arthur—a stylish men’s clothing store run by Arthur de Shahinian and his son, Tavit, since 1978 that sells bespoke men’s shirts with silk linings and hand-sewn button holes and suits; 2165 rue Crescent
  • Ben and Tournesol—a housewares boutique with pillows, linens, and duvets from Designers Guild and products by Hermes and Fred Perry among others; 4915 rue Sherbrooke Ouest
  • Billie—a favorite Montreal boutique with bookcases, drawers, and shelves of stylish dresses, blouses, sweaters, and shoes; 1012 av. Laurier Ouest
  • Bleu Comme le Ciel—a jewelry store with costume jewelry by designers such as Ginette NY and Reminiscence Paris; 2000 rue Peel
  • Bodybag by Jude—run by designer Judith Desjardins, this clothing store has British-inspired checkered and plaid clothing; 17 rue Bernard Ouest
  • Boutique 1861—a boutique that has sensual, lacy, and affordable clothing in an all-white interior; 3670 boul. St-Laurent
  • Boutique Encore—an affordable designer clothing store with labels such as Hermes, Chanel, and Gucci for women and Armani and Hugo Boss for men; 2145 rue Crescent
  • Browns—the flagship store of this local institution has shoes and accessories for men and women by its own label and brands such as Michael Kors, Cole Haan, Steve Madden, and Stuart Weitzman; 1191 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Buffalo David Bitton—a beloved clothing brand with well-fitted jeans and other clothing and accessories for men and women; 1395 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Centre Eaton de Montreal—a mall with 175 stores, a lower level food court with free Wi-Fi, and a branch of the Musee Grevin, a celebrity wax museum; 705 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Citizen Vintage—a vintage clothing store with a selection curated by the owners and organized by color that changes on a regular basis; 5330 boul. St-Laurent
  • Cite Deco—an antique furniture store with teak armchairs, mirrors, and furnishings from the 1930s to the 1960s with some from the 1980s; 1761 rue Amherst
  • Complexe Les Ailes—a shopping mall with the only downtown Sephora and stores such as Forever 21, Swarovski, and SAQ as well as Asian food counters; 677 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Cuir Danier—a Toronto-based chain with leather jackets, skirts, pants, hats, and handbags; 1 Place Ville-Marie
  • Delano Design—a beautiful and stylish modern boutique with selections from Canadian and European designers; 70 rue St-Paul Ouest
  • Deuxieme Peau—a French lingerie and bathing suit shop with suits from French, Spanish, and Australian designers; 4457 rue St-Denis
  • Duo—a menswear store with designer labels like Alexander Wang, suits, and limited-edition Nikes; 30 rue Prince-Arthur Ouest
  • ERA Vintage Wear—an upscale boutique with vintage clothing, shoes, and accessories from the 1920s to the mid-1980s that is sometimes frequented by clients such as Julianne Moore and Cate Blanchett; 1001 rue Lenoir, suite 514
  • Editorial Boutique—a downtown boutique with a large following and brands such as Citizens of Humanity, Erin Wasson, Luv U Always, For Love of Lemons, Unif, and Jeffrey Campbell; 1455 rue Stanley
  • Espace Pepin—owned by a painter, this pretty boutique is stocked with romantic clothing, shoes, housewares, and furniture; 350 rue St-Paul Ouest
  • Eva B—a vintage clothing store with clothes, shoes, jewelry, and glasses, a $1 section, and an in-store café; 2015 boul. St-Laurent
  • Franc Jeu—a French toy store with Corolle dolls from France and toys by Quebec’s Jouets Boom and Gladius lines; Place Versailles, 7275 rue Sherbrooke Est
  • General 54—a women’s clothing store with locally designed clothes and the owner’s clothing line; 5145 boul. St-Laurent
  • Gourmet Laurier—a gourmet food store with chocolate, candies, coffee beans, fine cheeses, and charcuterie among other imported goods; 1042 av. Laurier Ouest
  • Grand Central—an antique store with chandeliers, candelabras, armchairs, and other decorative pieces from the 18th and 19th centuries; 2448 rue Notre-Dame Ouest
  • Harry Rosen—a high-end menswear shop with casual and formal apparel, wallets, watches, and hats by designers such as 7 for all Mankind, Michael Kors, and Cole Haan; Cours Mont-Royal, 1455 rue Peel, Suite 227
  • Henriette L—a boutique with accessories from lines such as Sonia Rykiel, Jean-Paul Gaultier, and Issey Miyake; 1031 av. Laurier Ouest
  • Hudson’s Bay—a descendant of the 17th century fur-trading company, Hudson’s Bay Company, this has been a department store since 1891 and is famous for its duffel coats and red, green, and white-striped blankets; it also sells fashionable clothing, housewares, and toys; 585 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Jacob—a clothing store popular with young businesswomen that has four floors of stylish separates and dresses with a basement bargain level; 1220 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • James—a boutique with flowy tunics, embroidered blouses, and white cotton dresses as well as designer jeans and Minnetonka moccasins; 4910 rue Sherbrooke Ouest
  • Joshua David—a small boutique with modern designers such as Diane von Furstenberg, Alexander McQueen, and Rich and Skinny jeans; 4926 rue Sherbrooke Ouest
  • Kanuk—a winter apparel store with coats, parkas, and rain gear; 484 rue Rachel Est
  • Kaufmann de Suisse—a high-end family-run jeweler with gold and platinum bands and a Philippe Patek corner; 2195 rue Crescent
  • La Maison Simons—a department store with youth-oriented brands on the ground floor and more mature offerings on the second floor with some luxury brands like Chloe and Missoni; 977 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • La Vielle Europe—a deli with sausages, cheeses, European chocolates, and jams; 3855 boul. St-Laurent
  • Le Chateau—a Quebec-based clothing chain with affordable H&M-style clothes for men and women including stylish suits, dresses, and evening attire as well as shoes, handbags, and jewelry; 1310 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Les Cours Mont-Royal—a mall with stylish boutiques and brands such as Club Monaco and DKNY as well as a spa and professional salon; 1455 rue Peel
  • M0851—a very popular designer leather clothing and handbags destination; 3526 boul. St-Laurent
  • Marche Jean-Talon—a huge outdoor marketplace with produce stalls in the summer and fall and shops that sell sausages, fish, cheese, bread, pastries, and delicacies; 7070 av. Henri-Julien
  • Marie Saint Pierre—the top female designer in Quebec and known throughout Canada who is celebrated for her pleated and ruffled clothing that is modern and sophisticated as well as a new wedding collection; 2081 rue de la Montagne
  • Pretty Ballerinas—a small boutique with handmade Spanish ballet flats and Barbour handbags; 392 av. Victoria
  • TNT—a large women’s clothing store with clothes, shoes, and accessories by labels such as Stella Forest, Lauren Moshi, and Michael Stars and a coffee shop; 4100 rue-Ste Catherine Ouest
  • Tres Chic Styling—a reasonably priced designer clothing store with denim and cocktail dresses and other selections; 1069 av. Laurier Ouest, Suite 2
  • Vestibule—a pretty boutique with whimsical and feminine clothing and home décor; 5157 boul. St-Laurent

Sights in Montreal

Montreal seems to be a very historic and religious French-speaking city that has a rich cultural and military history. It was the site of the 1967 World Expo and the 1976 Olympics. I wouldn’t mind checking out some of these places for myself.

  • Basilique Notre-Dame-de-Montreal (Our Lady of Montreal Basilica)—a landmark Gothic Revival style church opened in 1829 with 228-foot twin towers in the front and thousands of 24-karat gold stars on the ceiling as well as a 12-ton bass bell that is the largest in North America and a 7,000-pipe Casavant organ; 110 rue Notre-Dame Ouest
  • Biodome—a domed and climate-controlled converted Olympic velodrome that is part of the Space for Life complex and features four ecosystems—a boreal forest, a tropical forest, a polar landscape, and the St. Lawrence River—each with native flora and fauna; 4777 av. Pierre-de-Coubertin
  • Biosphere—an environmental center that was once the American Pavilion in the 1967 World Expo that focuses on protecting the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River and has interactive exhibits on climate change, sustainable energy, and air pollution; Ille Ste-Helene, 160 Chemin Tour-de-Isle
  • Centre des Sciences de Montreal—a family-friendly science center with activities such as creating energy-efficient bikes, writing news reports for television, manufacturing T-shirts, riding unicycle 20 feet above the ground, and creating an animated movie with a special area for children ages 4 to 7 along with an IMAX theater, bistro, coffee and pastry shop, and food court; Quai King Edward
  • Chalet du Mont-Royal—a terrace in the front provides for a great view of the city, the river, and the countryside while inside are murals depicting Canadian history; Off Voie Camillien-Houde
  • Chateau Dufresne—adjoining homes of two shoe manufacturers, Oscar and Marius Dufresne, from the early 20th century that were considered to be part of a palace and was a boys’ school in the 1950s; 2929 rue Jeanne D’ Arc
  • Exporail—Canada’s largest railroad museum with over 120 train cars and locomotives and a vintage tram that can take you around the museum; 110 rue St-Pierre, St-Constant
  • Fur Trade at Lachine National Historic Site—located at a waterfront park at the end of the Lachine Canal, this site was an 1803 stone warehouse that is now a museum commemorating the Canadian fur trade; 1255 boul. St-Joseph
  • Insectarium—a bug-shaped museum considered to be one of the largest in North America with over 250,000 insects in its collection including tree roaches and butterflies and occasionally chefs come in with delicacies such as deep-fried bees and chocolate-dipped locusts if that’s your cup of tea; 4581 rue Sherbrooke Est
  • Jardin Botanique (Botanical Garden)—a landmark botanical garden with 181 acres of plants in the summer and year-round greenhouses including more than 26,000 plant species and 30 thematic gardens such as a rose garden, alpine garden, and poisonous plant garden; the Japanese Garden has one of the best Western bonsai collections; 4101 rue Sherbrooke Est
  • La Ronde—an amusement park with thrilling rides, attractions, and roller coasters as well as Ferris wheels, boat rides, and children’s rides; 22 chemin Macdonald
  • Lachine Canal National Historic Site—a canal that was built in 1825 to transport boats and cargo across the Lachine Rapids and was closed to navigation in 1959 with the advent of the St. Lawrence Seaway; it was restored in 1978 by a federal agency that planted lawns and trees transforming it into a park where abandoned canneries, sugar refineries, and steelworks were converted into condominiums
  • Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre—a museum that recounts the story of Jewish communities before, during, and after the Holocaust by sharing the experiences of survivors from Montreal; 5151 Cote-Ste-Catherine Road
  • Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Musee des Beaux-Arts)—one of the first great art museums in North America with over 41,000 works of art from ancient times to the present with paintings, sculptures, graphic designs, photography, and decorative art; 1380 Sherbrooke West
  • Pointe-a-Calliere Museum—a national historic site with an underground circuit leading visitors through archaeological excavations of the site that was the birthplace of Montreal and also has year-round temporary local and international exhibitions; 350 Place Royale
  • Centre d’Histoire de Montreal—a museum that explores Montreal’s history from the 1600s to the present with three floors of historical drawings and exhibits and the top floor dedicated to the 1967 Montreal Expo; 335 Place d’Youville
  • Parc Jean-Drapeau—a spacious park by the St. Lawrence River with cycling paths, public art installations, gardens, and walking trails that is also home to the Casino de Montreal, La Ronde, Stewart Museum, and the Biosphere and was the site of the 1976 Olympic games; 1 Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve
  • Grevin Montreal—on the fifth floor of the Eaton Centre, this is a wax museum with over 120 figures including Canadian and international celebrities; 705 Sainte Catherine Street West
  • Chateau Ramezay Historic Site and Museum of Montreal—the first building in Montreal to be classified as an historic monument that has interesting collections and exhibits as well as multimedia depictions of historical figures; 280 Notre-Dame Est.
  • Maison St-Gabriel—a 17th century historic home where St. Marguerite Bourgeoys and her religious order trained young women in household management that includes equipment such as looms, butter churns, spit turners, and a granite sink; 2146 pl. Dublin
  • Montreal Canadiens Hall of Fame—a 10,000-square-foot museum dedicated to the Montreal Canadiens that includes memorabilia and a replica of the 1976-1977 locker room; Centre Bell, 1901 av. Des Canadiens-de-Montreal
  • Musee d’ Art Contemporain (Museum of Contemporary Art)—a modern art museum with over 5,000 works of art including canvases from Quebec’s 1930s artists splashed with colors; 185 rue Ste-Catherine Ouest
  • Musee McCord De L’Histoire Canadienne (McCord Museum of Canadian History)—a wealthy collector’s collection of paintings, costumes, toys, tools, drawings, and housewares from the 19th century as well as a reading room, documentation center, gift shop, bookstore, and a café; 690 rue Sherbrooke Ouest
  • Oratoire St-Joseph (St. Joseph’s Oratory)—the world’s largest and most heavily trafficked shrine dedicated to the patron saint of Canada, St. Joseph, with a huge copper dome, gardens, and a grand interior along with an inviting crypt where 10,000 votive candles shine before a dozen murals that depict St. Joseph’s virtues; 3800 chemin Queen Mary
  • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium—a modern planetarium opened in early 2013 that is one of only a few planetariums with two circular theaters with one that has astronomy exhibits and the other a multi-media venue; its permanent exhibit EXO: Our Search for Life in the Universe allows visitors to explore life on Earth and in the universe; 4801 av. Pierre-de-Coubertin
  • Patrick’s Basilica—built in 1847, this Gothic Revival style basilica has a high vaulted ceiling with green and gold mosaics as well as decorated tall columns that is popular with English-speaking Catholics in Montreal; 454 boul. Rene-Levesque
  • Stewart Museum—situated in the arsenal of Ile-Ste-Helene’s 1820s Old Fort, this museum has two floors with almost 27,000 artifacts such as military objects, images, rare books, maps, and weaponry; 20 chemin du Tour-de-I’isle, I’le Ste-Helene

 

Shopping in Quebec City

Quebec City is home to several shopping districts and malls and also seems to have good markets selling a variety of products.

  • Aux Petits Delices—part of the market at Les Halles du Petit Quarter, this vendor sells specialty cheeses, crackers, charcuterie, and condiments; 1197 av. Cartier
  • Bedo—a chain clothing store with stylish and affordably priced clothes; 1161 rue St-Jean
  • Benjo—a toy store with games, toys, children’s clothing, a café, a well-stocked bookstore with primarily French storybooks, and an electric train that can take you around the store; 550 boul. Charest Est, St-Roch
  • Camellia Sinensis Maison de The—a tea shop with 150 different teas from various locales including China, Japan, and Africa that have been primarily imported by the owners; 624 rue St-Joseph Est, St-Roch
  • Galeries de la Capitale—a large mall with 35 restaurants, 280 stores, an IMAX theater, and an indoor amusement park next to the mall; 5401 boul. Des Galeries, Lebourgneuf
  • Halles du Petit Quartier—a mall with restaurants and shops selling jewelry, fish, flowers, cheeses, pastries, breads, and other items; 1197 av. Cartier
  • L’ Heritage Antiquite—an antique store in the antiques district with Quebecois furniture, clocks, oil lamps, porcelain, and ceramics; 109 rue St-Paul
  • La Baie—a department store with clothes in all sizes from children’s sizes to adult sizes along with household items and cosmetics; Pl. Laurier
  • La Boite a Pain—a bakery with baguettes, multi-grain breads, dessert breads, sandwiches, and salads; 289 rue-St-Joseph Est, St-Roch
  • La Maison Simons—a Canadian chain department store with designer clothing, linens, and household items; 20 cote de la Fabrique
  • Laurier Quebec—the busiest mall in Quebec City with over 300 stores selling fashionable clothing, electronics, toys, and books located adjacent to two other malls, Place de la Cite and Place St-Foy; 2700 boul. Laurier
  • Le Blanc Mouton—a women’s clothing store with locally designed accessories, jewelry, and clothes; 51 Sous le Fort
  • Les Delices de L’Erable—a food store with products made from maple syrup including maple cookies and muffins as well as gelato; 1044 rue St-Jean
  • Les Promenades du Vieux-Quebec—a shopping district with expensive items such as clothing, perfume, and art as well as a restaurant and change bureau; 43 rue de Buade
  • Point d’Exclamation—artisans from Quebec designed the handcrafted bags, jewelry, hair accessories, paper, notebooks, cards, and paintings in this store; 762 rue St-Jean
  • Quartier Petit-Champlain—a pedestrian shopping mall with 50 boutiques, local businesses, and restaurants known for its Quebecois wooden sculptures, weavings, ceramics, and jewelry
  • Signatures Quebecoises—a basement clothing store with designer clothing and accessories; 50 rue St-Joseph Est, St-Roch
  • Zone—a popular electronics store with gadgets, tools, and accessories for home and office purposes; 999 av. Cartier

 

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